Thursday, September 29News That Matters
Shadow

Tag: droplets

Hydrogen-producing algal droplets may fuel alternative energy economy

Hydrogen-producing algal droplets may fuel alternative energy economy

Science
Nov. 25 (UPI) -- Scientists have developed droplet-based microbial factories that synthesize hydrogen when exposed to sunlight and air. The microbial factories could make hydrogen-based alternative fuels more economical. Hydrogen has been promised as the remedy for the world's addiction to fossil fuels. But the fuel isn't cheap or easy to make -- at least not cheap enough to make it an economical substitute for traditional oil and gas fuels. Advertisement In addition to being relatively expensive, current methods for hydrogen production are energy intensive and yield unwanted byproducts. Cleaner, more efficient hydrogen-producing technologies, however, could help make a hydrogen economy a reality. For the new study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications, researchers hi...
Longer-lingering droplets are less efficient carriers of COVID-19 virus

Longer-lingering droplets are less efficient carriers of COVID-19 virus

Science
Oct. 27 (UPI) -- New research -- published Tuesday in the journal Physics of Fluids -- suggests bigger, short-lived aerosol droplets pose a much greater risk of spreading COVID-19 than aerosol microdroplets, which are tiny particles that linger longest in the air. To better understand the behavior and virus-carrying potential of different types of aerosol droplets, researchers had volunteers breathe, speak and cough into a laser beam, which recorded the size and distribution of the array of aerosolized particles. Advertisement Researchers used a Rayleigh jet nozzle chip to generate the same distribution of droplets. The jet released aerosol droplets composed of 1 percent glycerol and 99 percent ethanol into a chamber. A sheet of laser light running across the middle of the chamber allowed...
New printer uses sound waves to shape ink droplets

New printer uses sound waves to shape ink droplets

Science
Aug. 31 (UPI) -- Scientists have found a way to print with sound. The new technology will help printers exert more precise control over the shape and viscosity of ink droplets. The acoustic printer won't be printing term papers or greeting cards. Instead, the technology could be used to synthesize biopharmaceuticals and cosmetics, as well as optical and conductive materials. "By harnessing acoustic forces, we have created a new technology that enables myriad materials to be printed in a drop-on-demand manner," Jennifer Lewis, a profess or bioengineering at Harvard University, said in a news release. Scientists have previously used sound waves to levitate particles and look for contaminants. Researchers have also bounced sound waves through a maze and reflected sound waves back toward thei...