Wednesday, June 29News That Matters
Shadow

Tag: drug

Drug prevents, delays Type 1 diabetes in 50% of those at risk, study finds

Drug prevents, delays Type 1 diabetes in 50% of those at risk, study finds

Health
March 3 (UPI) -- Half of those at risk for Type 1 diabetes treated with a new drug remained disease-free five years later, a study published Wednesday by the journal Science Translational Medicine found. Conversely, 22% of people who did not receive the drug remained disease-free five years after the start of the study, the data showed. Advertisement The drug, teplizumab, is a monoclonal antibody -- a synthetic version of the cells produced by the human immune system -- developed by the biotechnology company Provention and is designed to prevent the onset of Type 1 diabetes. Those who developed Type 1 diabetes after receiving teplizumab did so about five years after receiving the new drug, compared with 27 months for study participants who received a placebo, the researchers said. "If ap...
Study: Hepatitis drug speeds recovery in non-hospitalized COVID-19 patients

Study: Hepatitis drug speeds recovery in non-hospitalized COVID-19 patients

Health
Feb. 5 (UPI) -- A single injection of an experimental antiviral drug appears to speed recovery times in non-hospitalized patients with COVID-19, according to a study published Friday by Lancet Respiratory Medicine. In a phase 2 trial, testing whether the drug works for COVID-19 patients, those given peginterferon-lambda were four times as likely to have cleared the coronavirus infection within seven days. compared with those who received a placebo, the data showed. Advertisement The drug is being evaluated for the treatment of hepatitis D, a rare form of the liver disease, according to its manufacturer, Eiger Biopharmaceuticals, of Palo Alto, Calif. "This treatment has large therapeutic potential," study co-author Dr. Jordan Feld said in a statement. New treatments for COVID-19 are vital...
Chemotherapy drug may be effective against COVID-19, researchers say

Chemotherapy drug may be effective against COVID-19, researchers say

Health
Dec. 31 (UPI) -- The chemotherapy drug pralatrexate, originally developed to treat lymphoma, may be effective in patients with COVID-19, according to a study published Thursday by the journal PLOS Computational Biology. That's based on the results generated by a new computational drug screening approach created by researchers in China and lab experiments conducted by their colleagues at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology in Shenzhen, China, the researchers said. Advertisement "From our data, pralatrexate is able to potently inhibit [COVID-19] replication [better] ... than remdesivir," study co-author Yanjie Wei, executive director of the Center for High Performance Computing at the Shenzhen Institutes, told UPI. Since the start of the global pandemic earlier this year, researc...
Genetic mutations that cause malaria drug resistance common in Asia, Africa

Genetic mutations that cause malaria drug resistance common in Asia, Africa

Health
Dec. 31 (UPI) -- Genetic mutations that fuel resistance to a drug intended to prevent malaria in pregnant women and children are common in countries that are fighting the disease, according to a PLOS Genetics analysis. Mutations of a gene linked with resistance to the drug sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in the parasite that causes malaria were discovered in one-fourth of the samples collected in southeast Asia and one-third of those obtained in Africa, the researchers said. Advertisement The growth in the number of malaria parasites with mutations to the gene pfgch1 are concerning because they may increase resistance to the drug, they said. "We need to understand how these mutations work and monitor them as part of malaria surveillance programs," study co-author Taane Clark, a professor of gen...
Drug offers hope for acute myeloid leukemia treatment in older adults

Drug offers hope for acute myeloid leukemia treatment in older adults

Health
Dec. 24 (UPI) -- A new drug for acute myeloid leukemia, or AML, improves overall survival in people with the deadly blood cancer by up to 10 months, according to the results of a Phase 3 clinical trial published Thursday by the New England Journal of Medicine. In a study conducted at 148 hospitals in 23 countries, the drug, called CC-486, improved survival in patients age 55 and older, the data showed. Advertisement Those given the medication, a tablet formulation of the drug azacitidine, had an average survival from remission of almost 25 months, compared to 15 months for patients who did not take the drug. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved CC-486 in September. "It is very exciting to think that, by taking a tablet that is relatively well-tolerated, we can help reduce relap...