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Study: Mixing brain, nervous system-related drugs risky for dementia patients

Study: Mixing brain, nervous system-related drugs risky for dementia patients

Health
March 9 (UPI) -- Older adults who take three or more drugs for dementia or its complications could accelerate memory loss and declines in thinking ability as a result, according to a study published Tuesday by JAMA. Despite this risk, one in seven adults with dementia in the United Stated who is older than 65 and lives outside of a nursing home takes three or more drugs to treat dementia or related disorders, such as depression, the data showed. Advertisement This so-called "poly-pharmacy," or taking multiple prescription drugs, also can raise the risk for injury and death in the elderly, as some of these medications can cause fatigue, weakness and delirium. "Dementia comes with lots of behavioral issues, from changes in sleep and depression to apathy and withdrawal, and providers, patien...
US regulators OK genetically modified pig for food, drugs

US regulators OK genetically modified pig for food, drugs

Technology
U.S. regulators have approved a genetically modified pig for food and medical products, but the company behind it says you won't see it on supermarket shelves anytime soonBy CANDICE CHOI Associated PressDecember 15, 2020, 9:29 PM• 4 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleNEW YORK -- U.S. regulators have approved a genetically modified pig for food and medical products, making it the second such animal to get the green light for human consumption. But the company behind it says there are no imminent plans to sell it for meat.The pig is genetically engineered to eliminate the presence of alpha-gal, a type of sugar found in many mammals. The sugar makes its way into many products — including medications, cosmetics and food — and can cause allergic reactions in some people....
Study: Bacteria in vagina may impact effectiveness of HIV preventive drugs

Study: Bacteria in vagina may impact effectiveness of HIV preventive drugs

Health
Dec. 3 (UPI) -- The effectiveness of medication to prevent HIV in women depends at least in part on the health of vaginal bacteria, according to a study published Thursday by PLOS Pathogens. The medication, called PrEP, is designed to prevent HIV infection in people considered to be at higher risk for HIV, including men who have sex with men, IV drug users and sex workers. Advertisement PrEP is highly effective at preventing infection with the virus, reducing a person's risk for getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken as prescribed, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, research suggests that the drug works less well in women, although the exact reasons for this remain unclear. "The data in this study indicate that the vaginal microbime can impac...
Trump is taking two experimental drugs for COVID-19 – what are they?

Trump is taking two experimental drugs for COVID-19 – what are they?

Technology
Donald Trump has been given two experimental drugs after testing positive for COVID-19.White House doctor Sean Conley said the president was given a dose of an antibody drug being developed by Regeneron on Friday before he was taken to a military hospital where he has started remdesivir therapy. The president appeared upbeat as he landed at the Walter Reed Military Hospital in Maryland on Friday evening despite developing fatigue symptoms and having trouble breathing, according to an adviser.Sky News looks at what remdesivir and Regeneron's drug do, and how effective they have been in trials.Live updates on coronavirus from US, UK and around the world ...
NSAID painkillers less harmful, just as effective as opioid drugs, studies show

NSAID painkillers less harmful, just as effective as opioid drugs, studies show

Health
Aug. 17 (UPI) -- Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are just as effective as opioids at reducing pain from common injuries like strains and sprains, two analyses published Monday by the Annals of Internal Medicine found. People taking NSAIDs also are less likely to experience the potentially harmful risks associated with opioid use, including abuse and addiction, researchers from McMaster University in Canada said. Advertisement The findings come as the United States is still dealing with an "opioid epidemic" fueled by misuse and abuse of used prescribed pain medications, according to the researchers. "Although there are many treatment options available for addressing acute pain from musculoskeletal injuries, only a limited number of pharmacologic options are currently sup...