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Tag: Early

Early humans may have crossed Central Asian deserts during wetter conditions

Early humans may have crossed Central Asian deserts during wetter conditions

Science
May 30 (UPI) -- New research suggests northern and central Asia may have hosted early human migrations between 50,000 and 30,000 years ago. During the Late Pleistocene, early humans began spreading out across Eurasia. Previously, archaeologists and paleoanthropologists assumed pathways across northern and central Asia were blocked by mountains and deserts. As a result, most research efforts have focused on a southern migration route along the Indian Ocean. New research, however, suggests climate variation made northern and central Asia accessible to humans for brief periods of times. "Archaeological discussions of the migration routes of Pleistocene Homo sapiens have often focused on a 'coastal' route from Africa to Australia, skirting around India and Southeast Asia," Michael Petraglia,...
Talking money with Heidi Heitkamp: Learn to save early, it's the greatest thing you can do

Talking money with Heidi Heitkamp: Learn to save early, it's the greatest thing you can do

Finance
Former North Dakota Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp's path to the Capitol wasn't paved in gold. In fact, Heitkamp said growing up in rural North Dakota, her family faced many financial challenges. "We talked about money all the time and how there wasn't enough of it," she told CNBC. She said the first thing she ever paid for on her own was probably a school lunch. "We shared that family responsibility for a budget." She credits the lessons she learned early on for the fina...
Early spring rains bring rise in methane emissions across Alaska

Early spring rains bring rise in methane emissions across Alaska

Science
Feb. 4 (UPI) -- Analysis of a bog in Alaska suggests early spring rains cause permafrost to thaw and boosts methane emissions. According to observations made by researchers at the University of Washington, a 2016 spike in early spring rainfall caused permafrost to melt three weeks earlier than usual. As a result, plants began growing and methane-producing microbes proliferated. The head start resulted in a 30 percent increase in methane released by the bog during 2016. "Early rainfall sent a slog of warm water moving into our bog," Rebecca Neumann, an associate professor of environmental engineering, said in a news release. "We believe microbes in the bog got excited because they were warmed up, so they released nutrients from the soil that allowed more plant growth. Methane production an...
Near-complete fossil reveals evolution of advanced flight among early birds

Near-complete fossil reveals evolution of advanced flight among early birds

Science
Nov. 13 (UPI) -- The most complete skeleton of an enantiornithine bird has offered scientists new insights into the appearance and behavior of the unique group. Analysis of the 75-million-year-old suggests enantiornithines evolved advanced flying capabilities similar to those of modern birds. The fossil -- described Tuesday in the journal PeerJ -- is an example of convergent evolution among early groups of birds. Enantiornithines were quite successful during the Cretaceous period, thriving among other bird groups and dinosaurs between 145 and 66 million years ago. The remains of members of the group have been recovered from every continent except Antarctica. "Enantiornithines originate well past the divergence with other theropod dinosaurs, and are more closely related to living birds," J...
3 reasons to retire as early as you can

3 reasons to retire as early as you can

Finance
Planning young: a retirement roadmap Would you love to retire early? So many people have that goal, and for a variety of reasons. For some, it's a matter of escaping a tough work schedule and the pressures that come with it. For others, it's an opportunity to spend quality time with family and pursue hobbies. Many folks, however, have a hard time with the notion of retiring early, whether it be from a place of financial insecurity or guilt. But if early retirement appeals to you on any level, here are three reasons to go for it. 1. You can afford it Many folks slack in the retirement savings department all their lives. Case in point: The average American aged 50 to 55 has $ 124,831 socked away for the future, according to the Economic Policy Institute, which isn't a wh...