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Astronomers spot farthest galaxy ever, 13.5B light-years from Earth

Astronomers spot farthest galaxy ever, 13.5B light-years from Earth

Science
April 7 (UPI) -- A global team of astronomers has found the most distant space object ever, according to the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. It's a distant galaxy called HD1, some 13.5 billion light years away from Earth, with researchers offering two ideas of what, exactly, the galaxy is. The first paper, published this week in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters, is that HD1 could be creating stars at an astounding rate and could even be home to what's known as Population III stars. Population III stars are the universe's very first stars, which researchers say have never been seen until now. The second idea proposed by the team, in another paper published this week in the Astronomical Journal, is that HD1 could hold a supermassive black hole roug...
SpaceX Crew-1 astronauts to return to Earth from ISS

SpaceX Crew-1 astronauts to return to Earth from ISS

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., April 30 (UPI) -- The first operational crew of astronauts on a SpaceX orbital mission, Crew-1, plan to start their return to Earth on Friday after making history on a journey to the International Space Station. NASA plans to bring the crew of four home starting at 5:55 p.m. EDT, when the Crew Dragon capsule Resilience will undock from the space station. Advertisement After a relatively quick flight, the capsule is scheduled to splash down in the Atlantic Ocean near the coast of Florida at 11:36 a.m. Saturday. The flight marked the first time four people flew in a space capsule and was only the second crewed mission for SpaceX and NASA's commercial crew program. The capsule will fly automatically, or robotically, unless there is a serious problem, crew commander Mike Hopki...
Trillions of lightning bolts may have jumpstarted life on Earth

Trillions of lightning bolts may have jumpstarted life on Earth

Science
March 16 (UPI) -- Trillions and trillions of lightning strikes may have unlocked the phosphorous needed to spark life on Earth, according to a new study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. "This work helps us understand how life may have formed on Earth and how it could still be forming on other, Earth-like planets," lead author Benjamin Hess, a graduate student at Yale University, said in a news release. Advertisement The building blocks of life -- RNA, DNA and other biomolecules -- require a variety of elements, phosphorus being one of the most important. But billions of years ago, around the time scientists estimate life first emerged, phosphorous was limited and relatively inaccessible, bound up inside insoluble minerals within Earth's crust. Scientists previously...
Climate change: Carbon emission promises ‘put Earth on red alert’

Climate change: Carbon emission promises ‘put Earth on red alert’

Science
Getty ImagesThe world will heat by more than 1.5C unless nations produce tougher policies, a global stocktake has confirmed.Governments must halve emissions by 2030 if they intend the Earth to stay within the 1.5C “safe” threshold. But the latest set of national policies submitted to the UN shows emissions will merely be stabilised by 2030.The UN Secretary-General, António Guterres, called it a red alert for our planet. He said: "It shows governments are nowhere close to the level of ambition needed to limit climate change to 1.5 degrees and meet the goals of the Paris (Climate) Agreement. "The major emitters must step up with much more ambitious emissions reductions targets."Rejoining Paris sets ambitious climate goal for BidenChancellor 'must use Budget to make finance green'West Anta...

U of Louisiana-Lafayette mini-satellite zipping around Earth

Technology
A cubical satellite small enough to sit on the palm of your hand is zipping around the world and sending data about radiation to the Louisiana students who designed and built itByThe Associated PressJanuary 23, 2021, 5:30 PM• 3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleLAFAYETTE, La. -- A cubical satellite small enough to sit on the palm of your hand is zipping around the world and sending data about radiation to the Louisiana students who designed and built it.The satellite, called CAPE-3, carries a chip designed and built by students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette to detect radiation, with an eye to keeping astronauts safe.“The detectors would provide liquid crystal display readings so astronauts could constantly monitor how much radiation they’re being expo...