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Tag: Earth

Asteroid set for 'close' 43,300 mile flight past Earth on Friday

Asteroid set for 'close' 43,300 mile flight past Earth on Friday

Science
An asteroid up to 40m in size and only discovered five days ago, is due to skim past the Earth on Friday.Asteroid 2018 CB will pass by at just less than one-fifth the distance between the Earth and the Moon.It was first spotted by the Catalina Sky Survey in Tucson, Arizona, a Nasa-funded project to record potentially hazardous asteroids.However, while the pass is relatively close in astronomical terms, it's nowhere near enough to be a threat.The 15-40m space rock is set to make its closest approach to Earth at 22:27 GMT."Although 2018 CB is quite small, it might well be larger than the asteroid that entered the atmosphere over Chelyabinsk, Russia, almost exactly five years ago, in 2013," said Paul Chodas, manager of Nasa's Center for Near-Earth Object Studies. Media playback is unsupported...
20 years of changing seasons on Earth packed into 2½ minutes

20 years of changing seasons on Earth packed into 2½ minutes

Technology
NASA captured 20 years of changing seasons in a striking new global map of the home planet. The data visualization, released this week, shows Earth's fluctuations as seen from space. The polar ice caps and snow cover are shown ebbing and flowing with the seasons. The varying ocean shades of blue, green, red and purple depict the abundance — or lack — of undersea life. "It's like watching the Earth breathe. It's really remarkable," said NASA oceanographer Jeremy Werdell, who took part in the project. Two decades — from September 1997 to this past September — are crunched into 2 ? minutes of viewing. Werdell finds the imagery mesmerizing. "It's like all of my senses are being transported into space, and then you can compress time and rewind it, and just continually watch this kind of visuali
Artificially cooling Earth is a 'highly risky strategy,' researchers warn

Artificially cooling Earth is a 'highly risky strategy,' researchers warn

Science
Nov. 14 (UPI) -- Some scientists and policy officials have proposed artificial cooling as a solution to global warming. But a new study suggests any such efforts would present serious risks.One of the most popular forms of geoengineering is the manipulation of clouds, using aerosols to promote cloud formation and cloud brightening. Higher concentrations of clouds -- and brighter clouds -- can help reflect sunlight and reduce warming.The introduction of large amounts of aerosols into the atmosphere by volcanic eruptions has in the past triggered periods of global cooling.But new analysis at the University of Exeter showed such geoengineering efforts could have unintended consequences. An influx of aerosols in the atmosphere in the Northern Hemisphere, for example, would be likely to encoura...
Nasa carbon space observatory 'watches Earth breathe'

Nasa carbon space observatory 'watches Earth breathe'

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceA Nasa satellite has provided remarkable new insights on how CO2 is moved through the Earth's atmosphere. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) tracked the behaviour of the gas in 2015/2016 - a period when the planet experienced a major El Niño event. This climate phenomenon boosts the amount of CO2 in the air. The US space agency's OCO satellite was able to show how that increase was controlled by the response of tropical forests to heat and drought. The forests' ability to draw down carbon dioxide, some of it produced by human activity, was severely curtailed. The science has significant implications because the kind of conditions associated with El Niños are expected to become much more common under global warming. "If future climate is more l
Scientists propose space shield to protect Earth from solar storms

Scientists propose space shield to protect Earth from solar storms

Science
Oct. 6 (UPI) -- If governments and their space agencies are serious about protecting Earth from solar storms, one team of researchers argues a giant space shield is the most logical solution.Much attention is paid to the threat of comets and asteroids. In the past, violent collisions have triggered mass extinctions. Solar storms -- intense waves of high energy particles flung into space during coronal mass ejection -- aren't so much a threat to life. But they could seriously damage satellites, electric grids, communications systems and a variety of modern technologies.When a massive geomagnetic solar storm struck Earth in 1859, the only observable effect was a spate of vibrant auroras. If a similarly powerful storm hit Earth today, the global economy could suffer losses totaling in the tri...