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Tag: editing

Gene editing to produce ‘super dad’ livestock

Gene editing to produce ‘super dad’ livestock

Science
Scientists have produced gene-edited animals they say could serve as "super dads" or "surrogate sires".The pigs, goats, cattle and mice make sperm carrying the genetic material of donor animals.The researchers used a hi-tech gene editing tool to knock out a male fertility gene in animal embryos.The animals were born sterile, but began producing sperm after an injection of sperm-producing cells from donor animals.The technique would enable surrogate males to sire offspring carrying the genetic material of valuable elite animals such as prize bulls, said a US-UK team.This would be a step towards genetically enhancing livestock to improve food production, they added.Prof Jon Oatley, of Washington State University's College of Veteri...
Genome editing strategy could give rice, other crops nutritional boost

Genome editing strategy could give rice, other crops nutritional boost

Science
March 5 (UPI) -- Scientists have developed a new genome engineering strategy for boosting the levels of beta carotene, the precursor of vitamin A, in rice. The novel CRISPR technology method, described this week in the journal Nature Communications, could help plant scientists engineer healthier, more robust crops. Typically, genetic engineers use a special bacterium to transfer beta carotene-producing genes into the rice genome, but the technique is imprecise. Transgenes can end up in unwanted locations in the genome, compromising the plant's health and reducing yields. Scientists at the University of California Davis came up with a better way. "We used CRISPR to precisely target those genes onto genomic safe harbors, or chromosomal regions that we know won't cause any adverse effects ...
BBC acknowledges ‘mistake’ in Boris Johnson editing

BBC acknowledges ‘mistake’ in Boris Johnson editing

Entertainment
The BBC has said editing footage of Prime Minister Boris Johnson for a news bulletin was "a mistake on our part". The Prime Minister appeared on Question Time: Leaders Special on BBC One on Friday evening.The audience laughed when he was asked a question about how important it is for people in power to tell the truth.But the laughter and subsequent applause was absent from a cut-down version of the exchange on a lunchtime news bulletin the following day."This clip from the BBC's Question Time special, which was played out in full on the News at Ten on Friday evening and on other outlets, was shortened for timing reasons on Saturday's lunchtime bulletin, to edit out a repetitious phrase from Boris Johnson," the BBC said in a state...
DNA editing sees horned bull father six hornless calves

DNA editing sees horned bull father six hornless calves

Technology
Scientists say they have developed an alternative to the practice of de-horning cattle after a genome-edited horned bull fathered six hornless calves.Researchers at the University of California spent two years studying the offspring after altering the DNA of the father, which they hoped would influence the characteristics of its young. Their work - detailed in the journal Nature Biotechnology - proved successful, with none of them developing horns but otherwise being perfectly healthy.It is hoped the technology could sound the death knell for the unpleasant practice of de-horning, which farmers carry out to protect themselves and other animals from potential harm.Study author Alison Van Eenennaam said genome editing offers a pain-free alternative by introducing a naturally occurring geneti...
Gene editing wipes out mosquitoes in the lab

Gene editing wipes out mosquitoes in the lab

Science
Researchers have used gene editing to completely eliminate populations of mosquitoes in the lab.The team tested their technique on the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, which transmits malaria.They altered part of a gene called doublesex, which determines whether an individual mosquito develops as a male or as a female. This allowed the Imperial College London scientists to block reproduction in the female mosquitoes.They want to see if the technology could one day be used to control mosquito populations in the wild.Writing in the journal Nature Biotechnology, Prof Andrea Crisanti and colleagues report that caged populations of Anopheles gambiae collapsed within 7-11 generations.Dr Crisanti said: "2016 marked the first time in over two...