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Common gut bacteria blocks effects of Parkinson's drugs, study says

Common gut bacteria blocks effects of Parkinson's drugs, study says

Health
Jan. 18 (UPI) -- A common gut bacteria can block a common Parkinson's disease medicine from working on patients with the disease, a new study says. Gut bacteria metabolizes levodopa, a common Parkinson's medication, into dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain. Since dopamine can't pass through the blood-brain barrier, it saps the levodopa of its effectiveness, according to a study published Friday in the journal Nature Communications. "It is well established that gut bacteria can affect the brain," Sahar El Aidy, an assistant professor in microbiology at University of Groningen and study lead investigator, said in a news release. "There is a continuous chemical dialogue between gut bacteria and the brain, the so-called gut-brain axis." The less effect a normal dosage of levodopa has on...
What is Ambien and what are its known side effects?

What is Ambien and what are its known side effects?

Health
After Roseanne Barr posted a tweet comparing a former adviser of then-President Barack Obama to an ape, she later apologized in multiple tweets and said she made the racist comments while impaired by the pharmaceutical sleep aid Ambien. In now-deleted tweets, she said, "It was 2 in the morning and I was ambien tweeting-it was memorial day too-i went 2 far & do not want it defended." Another tweet she wrote said she was "not giving excuses for what I did(tweeted) but I've done weird stuff while on ambien- cracked eggs on the wall at 2am etc." The manufacturer of Ambien, Sanofi-Aventis, admitted there are side effects to the sleep medication, but said in a tweet, "People of all races, religions and nationalities work at Sanofi every day to improve the lives of people around the world. ...
Light-activated cancer drugs may minimize chemotherapy side effects

Light-activated cancer drugs may minimize chemotherapy side effects

Health
Feb. 13 (UPI) -- Chemotherapy drugs activated by light to treat cancer can minimize side effects by targeting strictly non-healthy cells, according to new research in Britain and Australia.The Monash Warwick Alliance, an intercontinental collaboration between the University of Warwick in Britain and Monash University in Australia, examined how a platinum-based chemotherapy drug candidate kills cancer cells in targeted areas after being activated by light -- but can be directed away from healthy tissue.'"The current shortcomings of most chemotherapeutic agents are unfortunately undeniable, and therefore there is ongoing effort to develop new therapies and improve our understanding of how these agents work in effort to develop not only more effective, but also more selective, therapies to re...
Nanoshells could deliver cancer drugs directly to tumors with fewer side effects

Nanoshells could deliver cancer drugs directly to tumors with fewer side effects

Health
Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Scientists at Rice University are perfecting a novel drug delivery system for treating cancer. The system utilizes gold nanoparticles, which, when zapped with a laser, release a drug inside the tumor cells.In recent lab tests, scientists used gold nanoparticles to smuggle toxic doses of two common cancer drugs, lapatinib and docetaxel, into breast cancer cells. When hit with the laser, the nanoshells successfully released the drug doses.Drugs used to treat cancer are especially toxic and are often rejected by tumor cells. To have an effect on the hard-to-penetrate cells, large doses are required. These large doses cause a variety of harmful, often intolerable side effects.By sneaking small doses into cancer cells, scientists can more accurately target tumors while avoiding ...
Warm waters off West Coast has lingering effects for salmon

Warm waters off West Coast has lingering effects for salmon

Technology
The mass of warm water known as "the blob" that heated up the North Pacific Ocean has dissipated, but scientists are still seeing the lingering effects of those unusually warm sea surface temperatures on Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead. Federal research surveys this summer caught among the lowest numbers of juvenile coho and Chinook salmon in 20 years, suggesting that many fish did not survive their first months at sea. Scientists warn that salmon fisheries may face hard times in the next few years. Fisheries managers also worry about below average runs of steelhead returning to the Columbia River now. Returns of adult steelhead that went to sea as juveniles a year ago so far rank among the lowest in 50 years. Scientists believe poor ocean conditions are likely to blame: Cold-water...