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Tag: endangered

New hope for one of world’s most endangered reptiles

New hope for one of world’s most endangered reptiles

Science
Baby crocodiles found living in a remote region of Nepal give hope for the future of one of the rarest and strangest reptiles on earth.With its distinctive long thin snout, the gharial is unique but critically endangered, with fewer than a thousand adults remaining in the wild.The discovery of 100 hatchlings is a boost for the potential recovery of the species, according to scientists.The crocodile is clinging to survival in India, Nepal and Bangladesh.Revealing details of the find, researcher Rikki Gumbs of ZSL (Zoological Society of London) said it was amazing to find the baby crocodiles basking on a sand bank in Bardia National Park. "Given the species is limited to around five populations across its entire range, this is such...

Butterfly on a bomb range: Endangered Species Act at work

Technology
In the unlikely setting of the world’s most populated military installation, amid all the regimented chaos, you’ll find the Endangered Species Act at work. There, as a 400-pound explosive resounds in the distance, a tiny St. Francis Satyr butterfly flits among the splotchy leaves, ready to lay as many as 100 eggs. At one point, this brown and frankly dull-looking butterfly could be found in only one place on Earth: Fort Bragg’s artillery range. Now, thanks in great measure to the 46-year-old federal act, they are found in eight more places — though all of them are on other parts of the Army base. And if all goes well, biologists will have just seeded habitat No. 10. One of Earth’s rarest butterfly species, there are maybe 3,000 St. Francis Satyrs. There are never going to be enough of the
Survey finds gain in endangered red squirrel population

Survey finds gain in endangered red squirrel population

Technology
Wildlife officials say an endangered squirrel subspecies in southeastern Arizona is fighting its way back after much of its mountain habitat was burned by a 2017 wildfireByThe Associated PressNovember 16, 2019, 5:17 AM1 min read Wildlife officials say an endangered squirrel subspecies in southeastern Arizona is fighting its way back after much of its mountain habitat was burned by a 2017 wildfire. The Arizona Game and Fish Department says the Mount Graham red squirrel’s population is stabilizing, with a 4% increase recorded in September during an annual survey that produced an estimate of 78 squirrels, up from 75 in 2018. According to the department, the population peaked at about 550 in the late 1990s. Before the 2017 wildfire, the population ranged between 200 and 300. Terrestrial wildli

Lots of good terns: Bird ready to fly off endangered list

Technology
After 34 years on the endangered species list, a tiny Midwestern bird is ready to fly free of federal protection. Once hurt the by the damming of major rivers like the Missouri and before that diminished by hunting for feathers for hats, the interior least tern population has increased tenfold since 1985 to more than 18,000. The number of nests has jumped from 48 to 480, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday in proposing to take the bird off the list. The delisting started six years after the service first suggested that the species has recovered and after a computer modeling showed the population will be stable. Even conservationists and advocacy groups that often battle the Trump administration over what goes on and off the endangered list hailed the long-trek migrating bird...
Endangered bats: The manicure helping to save a species

Endangered bats: The manicure helping to save a species

Science
One of the world's rarest bats is now confined to a single cave in Western Cuba with less than 750 remaining, according to a population survey.Scientists are highlighting the plight of the animal, saying its last home is vulnerable to collapse.The Cuban greater funnel-eared bat was rediscovered in 1992 after being declared extinct.Fossils of the species have been found across Cuba and neighbouring islands, suggesting it was once widespread.On an expedition to the cave, researchers used different colours of nail varnish to mark the bats' "nails" so they could tell each one apart and count them.They hope the estimate - numbering less than 1,000 - will be used to inform conservation efforts. The bat population is threatened by human...