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Tag: energy

Asian markets have renewable energy edge

Asian markets have renewable energy edge

Business
May 8 (UPI) -- Though more workers globally are on the payroll in the renewable energy sector, the industry is concentrated in Asia, an annual report found.The International Renewable Energy Agency estimates that 60 percent of all renewable energy jobs are in the Asian economies. For the solar panel industry, China has about 60 percent of the payrolls, representing about 2.2 million employees. China also accounts for 44 percent of the payrolls in the wind energy industry.Beijing and the city of Zhangjiakou are co-hosts for the 2022 Winter Olympic Games and a partnership with IRENA outlined a low-carbon road map that sees it draw 50 percent of its energy from renewable resources by 2020.Air quality concerns were raised for the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, where air quality has at times bee...
New nanoparticle could help solar panels convert unseen light into energy

New nanoparticle could help solar panels convert unseen light into energy

Science
April 23 (UPI) -- Scientists have developed a new nanoparticle that can absorb near-infrared light and reemit it as visible light, which could allow solar panels to convert unseen light into usable energy.Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory coated tiny particles in organic dyes. The dyes work like antennae, which allowed scientists to fine-tune the nanoparticle's light-converting properties."These organic dyes capture broad swaths of near-infrared light," Bruce Cohen, a scientist at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, said in a news release.Most solar technologies that focus on visible light fail to absorb near-infrared light, allowing a solid chunk of the solar spectrum to go to waste. Roughly 44 percent of all light that hits Earth's surface...
Ofgem imposes ban on catch-up energy bills

Ofgem imposes ban on catch-up energy bills

Business
Energy suppliers are to be banned from back-billing customers for gas and electricity used more than 12 months ago under new rules from Ofgem.Such charges, on average totalling £1,160 but in extreme cases more than £10,000, can arise due to problems with a supplier's billing systems or incorrect usage estimates, the regulator said.The new rules will come into effect in May for household consumers and in November for the smallest businesses.Suppliers would still be able to recoup the money beyond the 12-month period if customers have behaved unreasonably, such as by blocking access for meter readings.Rob Salter-Church, Ofgem's interim senior partner for consumers and competition, said: "Large catch-up bills can leave consumers struggling financially or even in debt to their supplier"Getting
Bitcoin energy use in Iceland set to overtake homes, says local firm

Bitcoin energy use in Iceland set to overtake homes, says local firm

Technology
Iceland is facing an "exponential" rise in Bitcoin mining that is gobbling up power resources, a spokesman for Icelandic energy firm HS Orka has said.This year, electricity use at Bitcoin mining data centres is likely to exceed that of all Iceland's homes, according to Johann Snorri Sigurbergsson.He said many potential customers were keen to get in on the act."If all these projects are realised, we won't have enough energy for it," he told the BBC.Mr Sigurbergsson's calculations were first reported by the Associated Press.Iceland has a small population, of around 340,000 people.But in recent years it has seen a marked increase in the number of new data centres, often built by firms wishing to tout green credentials. Nearly 100% of energy in Iceland comes from renewable sources.Bitcoin mini...
Energy riches fuel bitcoin craze for speculation-shy Iceland

Energy riches fuel bitcoin craze for speculation-shy Iceland

Technology
Iceland is expected to use more energy "mining" bitcoins and other virtual currencies this year than it uses to power its homes. With massive amounts of electricity needed to run the computers that create bitcoins, large virtual currency companies have established a base in the North Atlantic island nation blessed with an abundance of renewable energy. The new industry's relatively sudden growth prompted lawmaker Smari McCarthy of Iceland's Pirate Party to suggest taxing the profits of bitcoin mines. The initiative is likely to be well received by Icelanders, who are skeptical of speculative financial ventures after the country's catastrophic 2008 banking crash. "Under normal circumstances, companies that are creating value in Iceland pay a certain amount of tax to the government," McCart...