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Tag: exercise

Navy postpones Large Scale Exercise 2020 in response to COVID-19

Navy postpones Large Scale Exercise 2020 in response to COVID-19

Business
March 25 (UPI) -- The Navy confirmed Wednesday that it has postponed its Large Scale Exercise 2020 as the Navy and the joint force respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Inside Defense first reported that the exercise will be postponed until 2021 to keep the fleet healthy but also to allow the services to contribute to whole-of-government efforts around the country. The exercise was on track to continue as late as last week. According to the Pentagon, the cancellation was a joint decision made by U.S. Fleet Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet and U.S. Naval Forces Europe. According to USNI News, this was to be the first fleet exercise that incorporated unmanned technologies, as well as information warfare. "We don't do anything in the U.S military today without leveraging space," CNO Admiral Mike Gild...
FAA warns military training exercise could jam GPS signals in southeast, Caribbean

FAA warns military training exercise could jam GPS signals in southeast, Caribbean

Business
Jan. 17 (UPI) -- A military training exercise scheduled for this weekend could jam GPS signals in the Southeast and Caribbean, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. An FAA advisory warns pilots could experience "unreliable or unavailable GPS signal" during a training exercise scheduled for Jan. 16 through Jan. 24. The U.S. Navy's Carrier Strike Group Four will be conducting GPS testing exercises off the coast of Georgia, causing likely disruptions as low as 50 feet above ground level within 207 miles of the test location -- and as high as 40,000 feet within 460 miles. "The Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation is provided by the Department of Defense (DoD). Routine testing is conducted on the GPS," an FAA representative told Military Times. "The FAA issues advisories ...
Exercise may reduce risk for cancer by as much as 25 percent

Exercise may reduce risk for cancer by as much as 25 percent

Health
Dec. 26 (UPI) -- Resolving to exercise in the new year -- and sticking to it -- may help reduce a person's risk for cancer, a new study suggests. In findings published Thursday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, researchers at the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health report that people who engaged in physical activity as recommended by the National Institutes of Health were able to reduce their risk for seven different types of cancer by as much as 25 percent. This included common -- and deadly -- forms of the disease like colon and breast cancers, as well as endometrial cancer, kidney cancer, myeloma, liver cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. "Physical activity guidelines have largely been based on their impact on chro...
Heart strain from extreme exercise doesn’t cause permanent damage, study says

Heart strain from extreme exercise doesn’t cause permanent damage, study says

Health
June 27 (UPI) -- Performing strenuous exercise, like taking part in a 24-hour ultramarathon, won't permanently hurt a person's heart, new research shows. High-intensity running puts more strain on the heart and drives up biomarkers that would otherwise indicate cardiac risk, according to a study published in June in Heliyon. However, those elevated biomarkers don't cause permanent damage. "Experienced runners performed with greater intensity and speed which placed strains on their hearts," Rodrigo Hohl, a researcher at Federal University of Juiz de Fora and study co-lead investigator, said in a news release. "Novice runners ran with less intensity, which resulted in lower cardiac biomarker levels." The study included 25 people who took blood tests before and after they ran in a 24-hour u...
Eighteen-nation BALTOPS exercise wraps up in Germany

Eighteen-nation BALTOPS exercise wraps up in Germany

Business
June 21 (UPI) -- A 12-day, 18-nation naval training exercise, led by the U.S. Navy's Second Fleet, concluded on Friday in Kiel, Germany. The 47th annual Baltic Operations [BALTOPS] involved NATO allies 8,600 personnel in training "enhancing flexibility and interoperability among allied and partner nations," a Navy statement said. Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States, as well as NATO partner nations Finland and Sweden, participated in the exercise. "It is imperative that allies and partners unite to confront today's challenges," said Vice Adm. Andrew Lewis of Naval Forces Europe, who commanded the exercises. "Our combined efforts during BALTOPS demonstrate...