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Racial inequality in COVID-19 vaccine distribution reflects ‘broken’ U.S. healthcare system, experts say

Racial inequality in COVID-19 vaccine distribution reflects ‘broken’ U.S. healthcare system, experts say

Health
March 18 (UPI) -- The racial inequality in COVID-19 vaccine distribution across the United States reflects a "broken" healthcare system that has long overlooked communities of color, Stephen B. Thomas, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, said Thursday. In an analysis of roughly 50 million of the 113 million vaccine doses administered nationally so far, shots were given to 16% of residents of counties with low rates of poverty and unemployment and higher per capita income, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data released earlier this week showed. Advertisement In comparison, about 14% of residents of U.S. counties with higher rates of poverty and unemployment have received the shot, the agency reported. At least some of this disparity can be attribute...
Covid has ‘heightened’ eating anxieties, say experts

Covid has ‘heightened’ eating anxieties, say experts

Health
Vickie RichardsonPhoenix Richardson is 15 and one of his favourite things to eat is chorizo. Cook it on a raclette and you have food heaven. Food hell includes a very long list of things, as is true for others with his condition, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, or ARFID. When the pandemic hit, Phoenix's mum, Vickie, was frantically buying up "safe" foods he would eat. Pasta and sausages was their shopping stockpile, not toilet roll. The Covid outbreak has been particularly difficult for people affected by eating disorders, says the charity Beat.Spokesman Tom Quinn said demand for their helpline "soared" as a result."It's not surprising," he explained, "as those affected and their families have had to cope with extreme changes to their daily routines, support networks and care pl...
Covid: Brazil experts issue warning as hospitals ‘close to collapse’

Covid: Brazil experts issue warning as hospitals ‘close to collapse’

World
ReutersHealth systems in most of Brazil's largest cities are close to collapse due to Covid-19 cases, the country's leading health institute warns. More than 80% of intensive care unit beds are occupied in the capitals of 25 of Brazil's 27 states, Fiocruz said.Experts warn that the highly contagious variant in Brazil may have knock-on effects in the region and beyond."Brazil is a threat to humanity," Fiocruz epidemiologist Jesem Orellana told the AFP news agency.The country has recorded more than 266,000 deaths and 11 million cases since the pandemic began. It has the second highest number of deaths in the world after the US and the third highest number of confirmed cases. Despite this, President Jair Bolsonaro has consistently opposed quarantine measures and expert advice on fighting coro...

Due to Covid relief, experts brace for a flood of tax-filing extensions

Finance
Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, at the announcement of the $ 900 billion Covid-19 relief bill on Capitol Hill on Dec. 1, 2020.Tasos Katopodis | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesThe IRS may not have extended the deadline for Americans to file their tax returns as they did last year, but chances are millions of taxpayers will be applying for extra time to file their taxes this season."There will be more extensions than normal this year, and that's OK as long as people pay any tax due with their extension," said Tracy Marrin, a principal and director of tax consulting at financial services and advisory firm Rehmann. "It's better to extend and do the return properly rather than file and have to amend it later."Potential penalties and interest on taxes owed will begin accruing as of and April 15 for ...
Weather experts: Lack of planning caused cold catastrophe

Weather experts: Lack of planning caused cold catastrophe

Technology
This week’s killer freeze in the U.S. was no surprise.Government and private meteorologists saw it coming, some nearly three weeks in advance. They started sounding warnings two weeks ahead of time. They talked to officials. They issued blunt warnings through social media.And yet catastrophe happened. At least 20 people have died and 4 million homes at some point lost power, heat or water.Experts said meteorologists had both types of sciences down right: the math-oriented atmospheric physics for the forecast and the squishy social sciences on how to get their message across.“This became a disaster because of human and infrastructure frailty, a lack of planning for the worst case scenario and the enormity of the extreme weather,” said disaster science professor Jeannette Sut...