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Tag: explosion

The methane-filled lakes on Saturn’s moon Titan are explosion craters, model predicts

The methane-filled lakes on Saturn’s moon Titan are explosion craters, model predicts

Science
Sept. 9 (UPI) -- According to a new model developed by planetary scientists in Italy and the United States, many of the methane-filled lakes on Titan were likely formed after explosions of warming nitrogen left dozens of empty craters dotting the surface of Saturn's largest moon. Outside of Earth, Titan is the only planetary body in the solar system known to host stable liquid on its surface. While Earth hosts bodies of water, Titan's lakes are filled with liquid methane and ethane. On Earth, methane and ethane typically exist in gas form, but subzero temperatures on Titan allow the hydrocarbons to exist in liquid form. Previous models suggested Titan's lakes were formed over thousands of years as the liquid methane and ethane precipitated by Titan's clouds dissolving the moon's bedrock ...
Astronomers find white dwarf merger that may spawn future fiery explosion

Astronomers find white dwarf merger that may spawn future fiery explosion

Science
May 21 (UPI) -- Astronomers have discovered a rare celestial object. Scientists suggest the fiery orb was created when two dead white dwarfs merged and become reanimated. According to a new paper describing the unusual stellar object, published this week in the journal Nature, the orb is a ticking time bomb -- likely to explode with a fiery bang in the near future. Scientists first spotted the object while analyzing data collected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, satellite. Astronomers spotted a bright star at the center of a gas nebula, but were surprised to find no visible light, only infrared radiation, emanating from the nebula. When astronomers analyzed the spectrum emitted by the nebula and its central star, they determined the object contained neither hydrogen ...
NASA detects atomic-force meteor explosion above the Bering Sea

NASA detects atomic-force meteor explosion above the Bering Sea

Science
March 19 (UPI) -- According to NASA, a meteor exploded in Earth's atmosphere in December. The fireball exploded with a force 10 times that of the energy released by the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima -- the equivalent of 380 million pounds of TNT -- making it the second largest of its kind in the last 30 years. Only the Chelyabinsk meteor that exploded over southwest Russia six years ago, shattering the windows of local buildings, was larger. The Chelyabinsk blast was seen and heard by hundreds of people. Taxi cab dash cams recorded its approach. Because the latest explosion occurred over such a remote area -- Russia's Kamchatka peninsula -- the blast went unnoticed by the public. Lindley Johnson, planetary defense officer at NASA, told BBC News such a large explosion is only expected...
NASA spots enormous meteor explosion

NASA spots enormous meteor explosion

Technology
A meteor was the cause of an enormous explosion in the atmosphere last year, NASA has announced.The blast was 10 times more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. It was the second-largest such explosion in the last century, just behind the meteor which exploded over the Russian region of Chelyabinsk in 2013.The most recent meteor exploded over the Bering Sea, also near Russia.It was just 25.6km (16 miles) above the planet's surface and hurtling down at a steep angle of seven degrees when the friction of the atmosphere caused it to explode. The explosion was detected by US military satellites last year, and subsequently referred to NASA.According to NASA's planetary defence officer Lindley Johnson, the fireball exploded near to a common flight route, and so researchers...
US detects huge meteor explosion

US detects huge meteor explosion

Science
A huge fireball exploded in the Earth's atmosphere in December, according to Nasa.The blast was the second largest of its kind in 30 years, and the biggest since the fireball over Chelyabinsk in Russia six years ago.But it went largely unnoticed until now because it blew up over the Bering Sea, off Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula.The space rock exploded with 10 times the energy released by the Hiroshima atomic bomb.Lindley Johnson, planetary defence officer at Nasa, told BBC News a fireball this big is only expected about two or three times every 100 years. What do we know?At about noon local time on 18 December, the asteroid barrelled through the atmosphere at a speed of 32km/s, on a steep traject...