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Tag: Extreme

Drought spurs extreme measures to protect West's wild horses

Drought spurs extreme measures to protect West's wild horses

Technology
For what they say is the first time, volunteer groups in Arizona and Colorado are hauling thousands of gallons of water and truckloads of food to remote grazing grounds where springs have run dry and vegetation has disappeared. Federal land managers also have begun emergency roundups in desert areas of Utah and Nevada. "We've never seen it like this," said Simone Netherlands, president of the Arizona-based Salt River Wild Horse Management Group. In May, dozens of horses were found dead on the edge of a dried-up watering hole in northeastern Arizona. As spring turned to summer, drought conditions turned from bad to worse, Netherlands said. Parts of Utah, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico are under the most severe category of drought, though extreme conditions are present from California ...
What is PANDAS, the disorder some say can cause extreme behavioral changes in kids?

What is PANDAS, the disorder some say can cause extreme behavioral changes in kids?

Health
Alexia Baier was an eager-to-learn, 4-year-old girl beginning pre-K in a suburb outside of Chicago. She thrived academically -- counting, painting and playing with other children. But five months after starting pre-K, she was infected with a bacteria that several millions of people get every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bacteria, group A strep, caused Alexia to get strep throat, a condition children usually recover from easily with treatment. After 10 days of antibiotics, the infection disappeared but so did Alexia's bubbly personality. Within two days after completing antibiotics, Alexia began showing behavioral changes at home and eventually at school. She suddenly became defiant and explosive. "It was a lot of screaming, a lot of hitting and...
Changes in jet stream since 1960 responsible for uptick in extreme weather

Changes in jet stream since 1960 responsible for uptick in extreme weather

Science
Jan. 12 (UPI) -- Scientists have identified a link between jet stream variability during the last half-century and increases in extreme weather in Europe, including storms, flooding, drought, heatwaves and wildfires.Using tree rings from the British Isles and Mediterranean, scientists at the University of Arizona sussed out late-summer weather patterns across Western Europe going back nearly three centuries, to 1725."We find that the position of the North Atlantic Jet in summer has been a strong driver of climate extremes in Europe for the last 300 years," Valerie Trouet, a scientist at Arizona's Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, said in a news release.The work of Trouet and her colleagues helped provide context for modern observations of the jet stream's seasonal patterns. Their data -- p...
MIT engineers attempt to predict extreme events

MIT engineers attempt to predict extreme events

Science
Sept. 22 (UPI) -- Can a new mathematical framework pinpoint the warning signs before an extreme event? A group of engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology think so.Researchers at MIT have developed a set of mathematical equations that can be used to identify patterns that precede extreme events, like a rogue wave or instability inside a gas turbine."Currently there is no method to explain when these extreme events occur," Themistoklis Sapsis, an associate professor of mechanical and ocean engineering at MIT, said in a news release. "We have applied this framework to turbulent fluid flows, which are the Holy Grail of extreme events. They're encountered in climate dynamics in the form of extreme rainfall, in engineering fluid flows such as stresses around an airfoil, and acoust...
Extreme weather 'could kill up to 152,000 a year' in Europe by 2100

Extreme weather 'could kill up to 152,000 a year' in Europe by 2100

Science
Extreme weather could kill up to 152,000 people yearly in Europe by 2100 if nothing is done to curb the effects of climate change, scientists say.The number is 50 times more deaths than reported now, the study in The Lancet Planetary Health journal said.Heat waves would cause 99% of all weather-related deaths, it added, with southern Europe being worst affected.Experts said the findings were worrying but some warned the projections could be overestimated.If nothing is done to cut greenhouse gas emissions and to improve policies to reduce the impact against extreme weather events, the study by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre says:Deaths caused by extreme weather could rise from 3,000 a year between 1981 and 2010 to 152,000 between 2071 and 2100Two in three people in Europe w...