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Reporter covering protest killed on Facebook Live

Reporter covering protest killed on Facebook Live

World
The death of a journalist covering protests in Nicaragua has been captured on camera as he filmed on Facebook Live.Angel Gahona was reporting live on unrest in the central American country when he was shot dead.At least 25 others have been killed in the last few days amid demonstrations against increased taxes, according to human rights groups.Image:The last Facebook Live shot Angel Gahona took before he was shot deadMr Gahona was in the entrance to the city hall of the southeastern city of Bluefields on Saturday when he was hit by gunfire.The reporter was describing damage to a cash machine he was videoing with his phone as a cameraman filmed behind him when a shot rang out.Image:A petrol bomb explodes near riot policemenSuddenly, he falls to the ground as others around him are heard scre...
Facebook to exclude billions from European privacy laws

Facebook to exclude billions from European privacy laws

Technology
Facebook has changed its terms of service, meaning 1.5 billion members will not be protected under tough new privacy protections coming to Europe.The move comes as the firm faces a series of questions from lawmakers and regulators around the world over its handling of personal data.The change revolves around which users will be regulated via its European headquarters in Ireland. Facebook said it planned clearer privacy rules worldwide.The move, reported by Reuters, will see Facebook users outside the EU governed by Facebook Inc in the US rather than Facebook Ireland.It is widely seen as a way of the social network avoiding having to apply the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to countries outside the EU.The change will affect more than 70% of its more than two billion memb...
Facebook seeks facial recognition consent in EU and Canada

Facebook seeks facial recognition consent in EU and Canada

Technology
Facebook has started asking European and Canadian users to let it use facial recognition technology to identify them in photos and videos.Facebook originally began face-matching users outside Canada in 2011, but stopped doing so for EU citizens the following year after protests from regulators and privacy campaigners.The new request is one of several opt-in permissions being rolled out in advance of a new data privacy law.The move is likely to be controversial.The company is currently embroiled in a privacy scandal related to the use of its members' personal information by the political consultancy Cambridge Analytica.The social network is also facing a class-action lawsuit in the US for deploying the facial recognition technology there without users' explicit consent."Biometric identifica...
Facebook facial recognition faces class-action suit

Facebook facial recognition faces class-action suit

Technology
Facebook must face a class action lawsuit over its use of facial recognition technology, a California judge has ruled.The lawsuit alleges that Facebook gathered biometric information without users' explicit consent.It involves the "tag suggestions" technology, which spots users' friends in uploaded photos. The lawsuit says this breaches Illinois state law.Facebook said the case had no merit and it would fight it vigorously.However in his order, US District Judge James Donato wrote: "Facebook seems to believe... statutory damages could amount to billions of dollars."'Face templates'On Monday, Judge Donato ruled to certify a class of Facebook users - a key legal hurdle for a class action suit.In a successful class action suit, any person in that group could be entitled to compensation. The c...
Facebook CEO didn't have all the answers for Congress

Facebook CEO didn't have all the answers for Congress

Technology
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg often came across as one of the smartest people in the room as he jousted with U.S. lawmakers demanding to know how and why his company peers into the lives of its 2.2 billion users. But while some questions were elementary, others left Zuckerberg unable to offer clear explanations or specific answers. A series of tough inquiries about how much personal information Facebook vacuums up on and off its social network seemed particularly vexing for Zuckerberg, who couldn't quantify it. He was vague about whether Facebook was a monopoly and whether it would offer an ad-free option, as well as about how the company could offer the same level of privacy protection to users around the world. Zuckerberg squirmed when pressed about a 2011 agreement with the Federal Trad...