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Tag: fewer

Breast cancer: Test means fewer women will need chemotherapy

Breast cancer: Test means fewer women will need chemotherapy

Health
About 70% of women with the most common form of early stage breast cancer can be spared the "agony of chemotherapy", researchers say.It follows trials of a genetic test that analyses the danger of a tumour. Cancer doctors said the findings would change practice in UK clinics on Monday, and meant women in this group could be treated safely with just surgery and hormone therapy.Charities said the news, affecting 3,000 UK women a year, was "wonderful".Chemotherapy is often used after surgery to reduce the chance of breast cancer spreading or coming back. It saves lives, but side-effects of the toxic drugs range from vomiting, fatigue and infertility to permanent nerve pain. In rare cases it can lead to heart failure and leukaemia. T...
Apple sells fewer phones but profits rise

Apple sells fewer phones but profits rise

Business
Apple sold 77.3 million iPhones in the final months of 2017, slightly fewer than during the same period in the prior year.But higher prices compensated for the dip, lifting the firm's profits in the quarter to more than $ 20bn (£14bn).The record results, which included strong growth in Japan, were the first to provide a glimpse of sales of the firm's expensive iPhone X.Apple boss Tim Cook said iPhone X sales surpassed the firm's expectations.Apple released the 10th anniversary phone, which starts at about $ 1,000, in November. It has been the top-selling phone every week since, Mr Cook said. Investors had been worried that demand for the firm's products may be dimming.The number of iPhones sold in the period slipped 1% year-on-year, but Apple executives said it was important to remember t
Nanoshells could deliver cancer drugs directly to tumors with fewer side effects

Nanoshells could deliver cancer drugs directly to tumors with fewer side effects

Health
Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Scientists at Rice University are perfecting a novel drug delivery system for treating cancer. The system utilizes gold nanoparticles, which, when zapped with a laser, release a drug inside the tumor cells.In recent lab tests, scientists used gold nanoparticles to smuggle toxic doses of two common cancer drugs, lapatinib and docetaxel, into breast cancer cells. When hit with the laser, the nanoshells successfully released the drug doses.Drugs used to treat cancer are especially toxic and are often rejected by tumor cells. To have an effect on the hard-to-penetrate cells, large doses are required. These large doses cause a variety of harmful, often intolerable side effects.By sneaking small doses into cancer cells, scientists can more accurately target tumors while avoiding ...
Fewer cars not cleaner ones key to tackling air quality

Fewer cars not cleaner ones key to tackling air quality

Science
Plans to promote electric vehicles in the UK do not go far enough to tackle air pollution, according to a leading government adviser. Writing in the Guardian, Prof Frank Kelly said fewer cars, not just cleaner ones, were the key to cleaner air.Electric cars produce particulates from their tyres and brakes which are linked to serious health problems.Prof Kelly said that London should lead the way in promoting non-polluting transport policies. Just last week the government unveiled its strategy for tackling illegal levels of nitrogen dioxide in the air. The key element was a promise to end the sale of all new diesel and petrol cars from 2040. The government said there would be significant investments in ultra-low emission vehicles, with some £600m going into the development and manufacture
Fewer ambulance 999 calls to be classed as 'life-threatening'

Fewer ambulance 999 calls to be classed as 'life-threatening'

Health
Fewer 999 ambulance calls will be classed as life-threatening and needing a super-fast response in the biggest shake-up of the service in 40 years.The move by the NHS in England - and agreed by ministers - will result in about 8% of call-outs being classed as needing the quickest response.Currently half of call-outs are, but many are not serious or could wait longer for paramedics to arrive.NHS bosses said it would free up crews to reach the sickest more quickly.They said the targets that were being used now were "blunt" and "dysfunctional" and meant too many ambulances were being dispatched just to meet targets rather than prioritising patients appropriately.The changes have been backed by medical experts after being carefully piloted on 14m 999 calls over the past 18 months.In one of the...