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Caroline Flack wanted to ‘find harmony’ with boyfriend

Caroline Flack wanted to ‘find harmony’ with boyfriend

Entertainment
TV star Caroline Flack left a note before her death saying she had wanted to "find harmony" with her boyfriend Lewis Burton, an inquest was told.The ex-Love Island and X Factor host had been hounded by the media and faced a "show trial" after being accused of Mr Burton's assault, the court heard.Mr Burton told Poplar Coroner's Court the last time he had seen Ms Flack "she was not in a good place"."The media were constantly bashing her character," he said in a statement."[They were] writing hurtful stories... generally hounding her daily."Ms Flack was found dead at her home in Stoke Newington, London in February, while she was facing trial accused of assaulting Mr Burton - a charge she denied.The hearing was told the Crown Prosecu...
Astronomers find massive black hole in the early universe

Astronomers find massive black hole in the early universe

Science
June 25 (UPI) -- With the help of a trio of Hawaiian telescopes, astronomers have imaged the 13-billion-year-old light of a distant quasar -- the second-most distant quasar ever found. Scientists gave the new quasar an indigenous Hawaiian name, Pōniuāʻena, which means "unseen spinning source of creation, surrounded with brilliance." Researchers described the brilliant object in a new paper, which is available in preprint format online and will soon be published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Advertisement Quasars are like lighthouses, their beams hailing from far away in the ancient universe. Powered by supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies, quasars are some of the brightest objects in the universe. As astronomers peer deeper into the cosmos, they're able to see what t
Scientists find gene that reduces a plant’s pollen count

Scientists find gene that reduces a plant’s pollen count

Science
June 8 (UPI) -- Researchers have discovered a gene that lowers the number of pollen grains produced by a plant's flower. Pollen is to plants what sperm is to animals. The numbers of these two kinds of male gametes vary from plant to plant and animal to animal. Advertisement It seems logical that a larger number of male gametes would be advantageous, but many domesticated plants produce lower concentrations of pollen. Scientists have hypothesized that for species and varieties with high levels of self-fertilization and inbreeding, it might make sense to save resources by producing lower pollen numbers. However, the hypothesis remains unproven. Studies have failed to produce corroborating evidence. "So far, there has been little evidence to support this idea, because the production of male...
British researchers find no benefit for hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19

British researchers find no benefit for hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19

Health
June 5 (UPI) -- Hydroxychloroquine offers "no beneficial effect" in hospitalized patients with COVID-19, researchers at the University of Oxford In England announced Friday. Just over one in four patients who received the anti-malaria drug died within 28 days of starting treatment, while slightly less than one in four of those who received usual care -- basically supportive management of heart and lung symptoms -- died within that time frame, researchers heading up the RECOVERY trial said. Advertisement The findings are based on an analysis of data from 80 percent of the study participants, they said. "These data convincingly rule out any meaningful mortality benefit of hydroxychloroquine in patients hospitalized with COVID-19," they said in a statement. "Full results will be made availab...
Astronomers find hot stars peppered with massive magnetic spots

Astronomers find hot stars peppered with massive magnetic spots

Science
June 1 (UPI) -- Astronomers have discovered giant magnetic spots on the surfaces of hot stars hidden away in stellar clusters. Scientists also found evidence of superflare events, eruptions featuring several times more energy than those observed on the surface of the sun. The new survey of extreme horizontal branch stars, published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy, could help scientists unravel some of the mysterious of these unusual stellar objects. Advertisement "These hot and small stars are special because we know they will bypass one of the final phases in the life of a typical star and will die prematurely," lead researcher Yazan Momany, scientist at the INAF Astronomical Observatory of Padua in Italy, said in a news release. "In our galaxy, these peculiar hot objects are gene...