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Arctic voyage finds global warming impact on ice, animals

Arctic voyage finds global warming impact on ice, animals

Technology
The email arrived in mid-June, seeking to explode any notion that global warming might turn our Arctic expedition into a summer cruise. "The most important piece of clothing to pack is good, sturdy and warm boots. There is going to be snow and ice on the deck of the icebreaker," it read. "Quality boots are key." The Associated Press was joining international researchers on a month-long, 10,000 kilometer (6,200-mile) journey to document the impact of climate change on the forbidding ice and frigid waters of the Far North. But once the ship entered the fabled Northwest Passage between the Atlantic and the Pacific, there would be nowhere to stop for supplies, no port to shelter in and no help for hundreds of miles if things went wrong. A change in the weather might cause the mercury to drop ...
Your Instagram feed may reveal if you have depression, study finds

Your Instagram feed may reveal if you have depression, study finds

Health
Your Instagram feed may be better at recognizing signs of depression than your doctor, according to a study from researchers at Harvard University and the University of Vermont. Researchers used a machine learning computer program to analyze 43,950 Instagram photos from 166 participants. They found that the computer's analysis of Instagram feeds was better at diagnosing depression than a general practitioner. The study, spearheaded by Andrew G. Reece at Harvard University's Department of Psychology and Chirstopher M. Danforth at the University of Vermont's Computational Story Lab, also found that certain Instagram filters were associated with depression. People with depression tended to either not use filters, or use to disproportionately favor the "Inkwell" filter -- which makes your ...
Study finds Alaska's North Slope snow-free season increasing

Study finds Alaska's North Slope snow-free season increasing

Science
Aug. 4 (UPI) -- Scientists discover that Alaska's North Slope snow-free season is lengthening due to atmospheric dynamics and sea ice conditions.The study, published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, found that snow is melting earlier in the spring and the snow-in date is occurring later in the fall.Researchers from CIRES and NOAA believe atmospheric dynamics and sea ice conditions are to blame for the lengthening of the snow-free season on the North Slope leading to issues such as birds laying eggs sooner and iced-over rivers flowing earlier."The timing of snowmelt and length of the snow-free season significantly impacts weather, the permafrost, and wildlife-in short, the Arctic terrestrial system as a whole," Christopher Cox, a scientist with CIRES at the University...
Robot finds likely melted fuel heap inside Fukushima reactor

Robot finds likely melted fuel heap inside Fukushima reactor

Technology
Images captured by an underwater robot showed massive deposits believed to be melted nuclear fuel covering the floor of a damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. The robot found large amounts of solidified lava-like rocks and lumps in layers as thick as 1 meter (3 feet) on the bottom inside of a main structure called the pedestal that sits underneath the core inside the primary containment vessel of Fukushima's Unit 3 reactor, said the plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co. On Friday, the robot spotted suspected debris of melted fuel for the first time since the 2011 earthquake and tsunami caused multiple meltdowns and destroyed the plant. The three-day probe of Unit 3 ended Saturday. Locating and analyzing the fuel debris and damage in each of the plant's three w...
Study finds inverse relationship between foot traffic and crime

Study finds inverse relationship between foot traffic and crime

Science
July 20 (UPI) -- Researchers in California have identified a strong inverse correlation between foot traffic and crime. The more foot traffic, the more eyes on the street, the lower the rates of crime.The correlation was discovered by a pair of researchers from California who set out to study the impacts of marijuana dispensaries on crime.In 2010, in response to public concerns over a supposed link between pot dispensaries and crime, the Los Angeles City Council voted to curb the number of business permits to dispensaries. Roughly two-thirds of the city's dispensaries closed. After a barrage of complaints from patients and patrons, the city council reneged and many dispensaries reopened.Tom Chang, an assistant professor of finance and business economics at the University of Southern Califo...