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20% of smoking-related cancer survivors continue to smoke, study finds

20% of smoking-related cancer survivors continue to smoke, study finds

Health
July 2 (UPI) -- Nearly 20 percent of survivors of smoking-related cancers continued to smoke even after recovery, according to a study published Thursday by JAMA Network Open. Smoking-related cancers include those of the bladder, blood, cervix, colon, esophagus, kidney, larynx or windpipe, leukemia, lung, liver, mouth, tongue, lip, pancreas, rectum, stomach, throat or pharynx and uterus, the researchers said. Advertisement The percentage was far greater among survivors of all types of cancer who had been smokers. More than half -- 56 percent -- remained active smokers, they said. "The percentage of current smokers among smoking-related cancer survivors was ... substantially higher than that in the general population of about 14 percent," study co-author Sanjay Shete told UPI. "We expecte...
Incidence of thyroid cancer has doubled globally, analysis finds

Incidence of thyroid cancer has doubled globally, analysis finds

Health
June 26 (UPI) -- The number of people diagnosed with thyroid cancer has more than doubled worldwide since 1990, an analysis published Friday by JAMA Network has found. Much of the increase has been fueled by a rapid rise of cases in countries in southern and eastern Asia, which accounted for more than 40 percent of global diagnoses in 2017, the most recent year for which data are available, the researchers said. Advertisement In addition, more than 70 percent of those diagnosed with the cancer are women, they said. "The significant geographical disparities might be explained by health resource imbalance and gene-environment interactions," co-author Zhijun Dai told UPI. "A third of thyroid cancer patients existed in countries with high socio-demographic index," a comprehensive measurement...
Repeated head impacts, brain injury increase risk for depression, study finds

Repeated head impacts, brain injury increase risk for depression, study finds

Health
June 26 (UPI) -- Head injuries experienced while young may increase a person's risk for depression and dementia decades later, according to a study published Friday by the journal Neurology. In general, those with a history of repetitive head impacts scored 1.24 points higher on a 15-point depression symptom scale than those without a history, the researchers found. Advertisement Study participants with a history of traumatic brain injury, or TBI, had scores up to 0.75 points higher, they said. "The findings underscore that repetitive hits to the head, such as those from contact sport participation or physical abuse, might be associated with later-life symptoms of depression," study co-author Michael Alosco said in a press release. "It should be made clear that this association is likely...
Tanezumab safe and effective in the treatment of chronic lower-back pain, study finds

Tanezumab safe and effective in the treatment of chronic lower-back pain, study finds

Health
June 19 (UPI) -- Tanezumab appears to reduce chronic back pain, according to a study published Friday in the journal Pain. The drug is a monoclonal antibody and doesn't have the same potentially serious side effects of other drugs used in chronic back pain, including opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, researchers said. Advertisement "This demonstration of efficacy is a major breakthrough in the global search to develop non-opioid treatments for chronic pain," study co-author Dr. John Markman, said in a statement. "There were also improvements in function linked to the reduction in pain severity," said Markman, director of the Translational Pain Research Program at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Some 13 percent of all adults aged 20 to 69 years in t...
Signs of Type 2 diabetes might begin to appear in childhood, study finds

Signs of Type 2 diabetes might begin to appear in childhood, study finds

Health
June 19 (UPI) -- People at risk for Type 2 diabetes as adults might start to show signs of the disease as early as 8 years old, a study published Friday by the journal Diabetes Care found. At that age, common signs of Type 2 diabetes, such as reduced HDL cholesterol levels and elevated LDL cholesterol levels, begin to appear, the researchers said. Advertisement By age 16, other warning signs such as increased inflammation and levels of amino acids in the blood are also apparent, they said. "Diabetes is most common in older age, but we see signs of disease susceptibility very early on -- about 50 years before it's usually diagnosed," study co-author Joshua Bell said in a statement. "Knowing what these early signs look like widens our window of opportunity to intervene much earlier and sto...