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Firms on Caribbean island chain own 23,000 UK properties

Firms on Caribbean island chain own 23,000 UK properties

Business
A quarter of property in England and Wales owned by overseas firms is held by entities registered in the British Virgin Islands, BBC analysis has found.The Caribbean archipelago is the official home of companies that own 23,000 properties - more than any other country.They are owned by 11,700 firms registered in the overseas territory.The finding emerged from BBC analysis conducted of Land Registry data on overseas property ownership.The research found there are around 97,000 properties in England and Wales held by overseas firms, as of January 2018. It adds to concerns that companies registered in British-controlled tax havens have been used to avoid tax. Sorry, your browser cannot display this map Map built by Carto. If you can't see the map, please click here to op...
Net firms 'better' at removing hate speech, says EU

Net firms 'better' at removing hate speech, says EU

Technology
Net firms are getting better at removing illegal hate speech, according to the European Union.Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Microsoft all took place in a voluntary EU scheme to monitor their platforms for a six-week period at the end of 2017.On average they removed 70% of material deemed to be offensive. This is up from 28% in 2016 and 59% in 2017.Instagram has announced that it will now also join the scheme.Under the voluntary code of conduct scheme, introduced in May 2016, the technology firms have committed to combating the spread of hate speech, whether that be xenophobia, anti-migrant or anti-Islam sentiments.Firms are getting better at removing the majority of such content reported to it within 24 hours but further work could be done on feeding back to users, the EU said.'Fundamenta...
US Senate in Russian hackers' crosshairs: Cybersecurity firms

US Senate in Russian hackers' crosshairs: Cybersecurity firms

Technology
The same Russian government-aligned hackers who penetrated the Democratic Party have spent the past few months laying the groundwork for an espionage campaign against the U.S. Senate, a cybersecurity firm said in a report Friday. The revelation suggests the group often nicknamed Fancy Bear, whose hacking campaign scrambled the 2016 U.S. electoral contest, is still busy trying to gather the emails of America's political elite. "They're still very active — in making preparations at least — to influence public opinion again," said Feike Hacquebord, a security researcher at Trend Micro Inc. who authoered the report. "They are looking for information they might leak later." The Senate Sergeant at Arms office, which is responsible for the upper house's security, declined to comment, but Nebrask
Gender pay gaps at 500 UK firms revealed

Gender pay gaps at 500 UK firms revealed

Business
The extent of the pay gap between male and female employees at some of the country's biggest firms has been revealed.Government figures show that men are paid nearly 65% more per hour at high street fashion store Phase Eight and nearly 52% more at EasyJet.Organisations with 250 or more workers must publish their figures by April, and so far 527 firms have done so.Nearly half of the organisations pay men at least one tenth more per hour and 426 of them pay men more, on average, per hour.Thousands more firms, public sector bodies and other organisations are expected to reveal their gender pay gaps in the next few months.EasyJet, which has been reporting on its pay gap since 2015, says the reason for the difference in hourly rate is because its best paid staff tend to be male pilots, while lo...
Two more illustrious Japanese firms admit to falsifying quality data

Two more illustrious Japanese firms admit to falsifying quality data

Finance
AKIO MORITA, co-founder of Sony, liked to recall his first trip to Germany in 1953, when a waiter stuck a small paper parasol in his ice-cream and sneered: “This is from your country.” Like many of his post-war compatriots, Mr Morita was ashamed that Japan was known for shoddy goods. The fierce drive to reverse that reputation resulted in the Deming Prize, a quality-control award named after an American business guru so revered in Japan that he received a medal from the emperor for contributing to its industrial rebirth. All that hard work is under threat.Toray Industries, a textiles and chemicals giant, is the latest pillar of corporate Japan to admit to quality problems. This week a subsidiary said it had faked inspections on reinforcement cords used to strengthen car tyres. Sadayuki Sak