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Tag: fish

Robots help bees and fish communicate

Robots help bees and fish communicate

Science
March 21 (UPI) -- Bees and fish can now converse with each other thanks to new robotics technology designed by researchers in Europe. Scientists developed robots to translate and deliver signals from groups of bees and schools of fish. The robots traded signals across an international border, allowing bees in Austria to talk to fish a few hundred miles away in Switzerland. "We created an unprecedented bridge between the two animal communities, enabling them to exchange some of their dynamics," Frank Bonnet, a robotics engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, or EPFL, said in a news release. Previously, researchers at EPFL's Mobile Robots Group have designed and deployed "spy" robots that blend in with groups of animals. Most recently, the team used a robot to in...
Fish recognize themselves in the mirror

Fish recognize themselves in the mirror

Science
Feb. 8 (UPI) -- The cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus, a small saltwater fish, can recognize itself in the mirror. When scientists present the colorful reef fish with a reflection of itself, the fish attempts to remove marks on its body, the most common tests for identifying self-awareness among animals. The research was conducted scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Germany and Osaka City University in Japan. The results were published this week in the journal PLOS Biology. Authors of the new study acknowledge that the reaction to their findings will depend largely on how one interprets the legitimacy or significance of the mirror test. "The behaviors we observe leave little doubt that this fish behaviorally fulfills all criteria of the mirror test as originally ...
Fish evolved near shorelines, not in deep waters, study says

Fish evolved near shorelines, not in deep waters, study says

Science
Oct. 26 (UPI) -- Fish likely evolved from shallow shorelines, dating back more than 400 years ago, according to scientists. New findings were published in Science magazine Friday on the evolution of vertebrae fish during the middle Paleozoic era, from 480 million to 360 million years ago. The study was conducted by a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan, University of Manchester and University of Birmingham. The team focused primarily on fossil vertebrates, both jawed and jawless fish. Scientists found that larger fish diversified near shorelines, and later thinner fish populated deeper marine and freshwater habitats. Their goal was to "complete a missing link in our evolutionary story" by closing some of the gaps of what researchers knew about ...
Jurassic-era piranha is world's earliest flesh-eating fish

Jurassic-era piranha is world's earliest flesh-eating fish

Science
Scientists have unearthed the fossilised remains of a piranha-like species that they say is the earliest known example of a flesh-eating fish.This bony creature, found in South Germany, lived about 150 million years ago and had the distinctive sharp teeth of modern-day piranhas. These Jurassic marauders used their razor teeth to tear chunks of flesh and fins off other fish.Other fish were found nearby which had been attacked by the ancient piranhas."We have other fish from the same locality with chunks missing from their fins," said Dr David Bellwood of James Cook University, Australia, who is one of the authors of the study."Feed on a fish and it is dead; nibble its fins and you have food for the future." ...
New small, neon fish species discovered

New small, neon fish species discovered

Science
Sept. 25 (UPI) -- Scientists aren't sure how a fish this brightly colored went undiscovered for so long. But it did. Tosanoides aphrodite, a new coral fish species, was described for the first time this week in the journal ZooKeys. Scientists discovered the neon species among the reefs of St. Paul's Rocks, an archipelago off the coast of Brazil. Perhaps it is the species' remote home in the middle of the equatorial Atlantic that made the fish so elusive. But once scientists spotted the bright pink, yellow and green fish, they couldn't look away. "This is one of the most beautiful fishes I've ever seen," Luiz Rocha, curator of fishes at the California Academy of Sciences, said in a news release. "It was so enchanting it made us ignore everything around it." Genetic analysis confirmed the ...