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Tag: fish

Fishermen ‘still illegally discarding dead fish’ says report

Fishermen ‘still illegally discarding dead fish’ says report

Science
Fishermen are continuing to illegally discard dead fish back into the sea, according to a House of Lords inquiry.The inquiry looked at the impact of the ban on fishing discards six months after new rules took effect.The committee's report said the new regulations have had "little impact", but industry leaders said this was the wrong conclusion.Fishing discards were prohibited after a campaign by the chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. North Sea cod stocks fall to 'critical' level Fish discard ban 'can only harm industry' The EU regulations were designed to stop fishermen throwing unwanted fish back into the sea dead, instead obliging skippers to land them.But the inquiry report claimed little had changed since the ban came into force, with no indications of...
‘Robot blood’ powers robotic fish in Cornell laboratory

‘Robot blood’ powers robotic fish in Cornell laboratory

Science
June 20 (UPI) -- Robot's still aren't conscious, but now they have blood, thanks to engineers at Cornell University. Scientists have developed a robotic fish powered by "robot blood." The hydraulic liquid circulatory system allows the robot to use, store and transfer energy. "In nature we see how long organisms can operate while doing sophisticated tasks. Robots can't perform similar feats for very long," Rob Shepherd, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell, said in a news release. "Our bio-inspired approach can dramatically increase the system's energy density while allowing soft robots to remain mobile for far longer." The unique hydraulic system powers undulating fan-like fins of the lionfish-inspired robot, helping it glide through its underwater envir...
Robots help bees and fish communicate

Robots help bees and fish communicate

Science
March 21 (UPI) -- Bees and fish can now converse with each other thanks to new robotics technology designed by researchers in Europe. Scientists developed robots to translate and deliver signals from groups of bees and schools of fish. The robots traded signals across an international border, allowing bees in Austria to talk to fish a few hundred miles away in Switzerland. "We created an unprecedented bridge between the two animal communities, enabling them to exchange some of their dynamics," Frank Bonnet, a robotics engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, or EPFL, said in a news release. Previously, researchers at EPFL's Mobile Robots Group have designed and deployed "spy" robots that blend in with groups of animals. Most recently, the team used a robot to in...
Fish recognize themselves in the mirror

Fish recognize themselves in the mirror

Science
Feb. 8 (UPI) -- The cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus, a small saltwater fish, can recognize itself in the mirror. When scientists present the colorful reef fish with a reflection of itself, the fish attempts to remove marks on its body, the most common tests for identifying self-awareness among animals. The research was conducted scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Germany and Osaka City University in Japan. The results were published this week in the journal PLOS Biology. Authors of the new study acknowledge that the reaction to their findings will depend largely on how one interprets the legitimacy or significance of the mirror test. "The behaviors we observe leave little doubt that this fish behaviorally fulfills all criteria of the mirror test as originally ...
Fish evolved near shorelines, not in deep waters, study says

Fish evolved near shorelines, not in deep waters, study says

Science
Oct. 26 (UPI) -- Fish likely evolved from shallow shorelines, dating back more than 400 years ago, according to scientists. New findings were published in Science magazine Friday on the evolution of vertebrae fish during the middle Paleozoic era, from 480 million to 360 million years ago. The study was conducted by a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan, University of Manchester and University of Birmingham. The team focused primarily on fossil vertebrates, both jawed and jawless fish. Scientists found that larger fish diversified near shorelines, and later thinner fish populated deeper marine and freshwater habitats. Their goal was to "complete a missing link in our evolutionary story" by closing some of the gaps of what researchers knew about ...