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Tag: flies

Disabled flies sleep more as they learn to adapt

Disabled flies sleep more as they learn to adapt

Science
May 8 (UPI) -- Some people need to psyche themselves up to meet challenges head on. For flies, tough times call for a little shuteye. New research suggests flies that are unable to fly sleep more as they learn to adapt to their disability. The research -- published Friday in the journal Science Advances -- could offer insights into the evolutionary origins of sleep, as well as the role sleep plays in human health and development. The sleep patterns of fruit flies are quite similar to those of humans. Young flies sleep more than older flies, with the need for sleep diminishing as a fly ages. Flies that are kept up all night catch up on sleep the next day. Caffeine keeps flies up, while antihistamines make them drowsy. In humans, sleep is important for learning and neural development, and...
When something smells foul, vinegar flies can't perceive pleasant odors

When something smells foul, vinegar flies can't perceive pleasant odors

Science
March 15 (UPI) -- Vinegar flies can't process pleasant odors when something smells bad. When faced with conflicting odors, the repellent odor supersedes, according to a new study. Previous studies showed the brain of the vinegar fly features separate neural circuits for good and bad smells. The studies also showed multiple pleasant odors can be perceived simultaneously by vinegar flies. When scientists layered good smells, the flies altered their behavior. For the latest study, published this week in the journal Nature Communications, researchers exposed vinegar flies to conflicting smells. Functional imaging technologies allowed the scientists to observe the brains of vinegar flies as they were exposed to both good odors and smells that repel. The experiments showed the repellent odor b...
Last operational F-18 Hornet squadron flies into the sunset

Last operational F-18 Hornet squadron flies into the sunset

Business
Feb. 5 (UPI) -- During a sundown ceremony, the last operational F/A-18C Hornet squadron took flight over Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia Beach, Va., as the military transitions to new jets. The "Blue Blasters," the lone Hornet squadron that has not transitioned to Boeing's F/A-18E Super Hornet, took flight on Feb. 1, the Navy announced on Monday. The Navy has flown the Hornet since 1978, including deploying the F/A-18A/B Hornet in 1983 and the upgraded F-18C/D model in 1987. The larger F/A-18E/F Super Hornet has flown since 1999. The remaining single-seat, twin-engine, supersonic Hornets took their last flight with Strike Fighter Squadron 34, taking a longer route on their final flight -- including near the First Flight Memorial near Kitty Hawk, N.C. The F/A-18 Hornet is the nation's...
'Iron Man' ex-marine flies assault course in jet pack

'Iron Man' ex-marine flies assault course in jet pack

Technology
A former Royal Marine has used a jet suit he invented to negotiate one of the toughest assault courses in the military. Richard Browning - nicknamed the "real-life Iron Man" - flew around the course at the Commando Training Centre in Lympstone, Devon.The 39-year-old managed to overcome the obstacles used to test new recruits.The suit uses five engines to generate 1,000bhp and can cruise at more than 50mph. Image: Mr Browning is chief test pilot of his own Gravity Industries company Mr Browning, founder and chief test pilot of Gravity Industries, said: "It's been at least a decade since I was last at the Commando Training Centre in Lympstone, when I was being awarded my coveted green beret."It is an absolute honour to ...