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Tag: food

Deprived areas 'have five times more fast food outlets'

Deprived areas 'have five times more fast food outlets'

Health
Deprived areas such as Blackpool and parts of Manchester and Liverpool have five times more fast food outlets than affluent areas, a survey suggests. The data, from Public Health England (PHE), compared levels of deprivation with numbers of takeaways such as chip shops, burger bars and pizza places. Experts say children exposed to fast food on the way home from school are more likely to eat unhealthily. PHE wants local authorities to refuse applications from new takeaways. One in three children is now overweight or obese by the age of 11.And children from poorer areas are more than twice as likely to be overweight. Adults are also affected, with research in Cambridge indicating people living closest to the largest number of fas...
Carbon dioxide crisis to hit supermarket food choice

Carbon dioxide crisis to hit supermarket food choice

Business
The carbon dioxide shortage will start affecting some supplies to supermarkets this weekend, the Food and Drink Federation has warned.CO2 is used to stun farm animals, put fizz in carbonated drinks and is used in packaging, but is in short supply.Federation chief executive Ian Wright said carbon dioxide supplies were not expected to resume until next week. He said that while stocks would not run out, "choice will be eroded".Mr Wright told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "We will see fewer chicken dishes, fewer pork and bacon dishes."We'll see probably less carbonated drinks and certainly bakery and other things that benefit from what's called modified atmosphere packaging, which is plastic packaging with a tray underneath and a dish of food in them." Why ...
Tea towels 'can cause food poisoning'

Tea towels 'can cause food poisoning'

Health
Multi-use of tea towels is putting households at risk of food poisoning, research suggests.Scientists from the University of Mauritius examined 100 towels that had been used for a month. They found E.coli was more likely to be found on towels used for multiple jobs, such as wiping utensils and cleaning surfaces, as well as drying hands.It was also more likely to be found on damp towels or those in households where meat was eaten. Multiple use increases the chance of cross-contamination of potential pathogens that can spread bacteria and lead to food poisoning.The government recommends washing or changing dish cloths, tea towels, sponges and oven gloves regularly and letting them dry before re-use. The research is being presented at the annual meeting of t...
Bonobos won't eat filthy food, offering clues to the origins of disgust

Bonobos won't eat filthy food, offering clues to the origins of disgust

Science
June 4 (UPI) -- Bonobos won't eat dirty food. In experiments, the great apes refused fruit that had been contaminated by feces. Scientists wanted to better understand the evolutionary origins of disgust. The reaction helps humans avoid exposure to pathogens, and the latest research suggests the reaction offers apes' similar benefits. Researchers at Kyoto University in Japan offered bonobos several food options: clean apple slices and apple slices tainted by either feces or dirt. Scientists also offered the apes banana slices positioned at various distances from fresh feces. The bonobos most avoided contaminated apples, opting for the clean slices, and were more likely to eat banana slices placed farther away from sources of pathogens. Tests showed the bonobos were also less likely to hav...
Food security in Cambodia faces threat due to hydropower

Food security in Cambodia faces threat due to hydropower

Science
May 31 (UPI) -- New dams for hydroelectricity are altering Cambodia's Mekong River, and could threaten fish migration, livelihoods and regional food security -- and the predictable seasonal patterns that farmers and anglers depend on. A new paper from the University of Illinois and Iowa State University, published this month in the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, suggests officials partner with locals, who have a deep knowledge of the river, to address the problem. Their knowledge, along with technical and scientific findings, is important for developing effective strategies to adapt to the changing flows and uses of the river. "Due to years of civil wars that destroyed infrastructure and hindered modernization, only a little more than half of the Cambodian population has access ...