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Gorillas can learn to clean food on their own, without social cues

Gorillas can learn to clean food on their own, without social cues

Science
Dec. 4 (UPI) -- Gorillas don't need to witnesses others cleaning their food to adopt the behavior. They can learn it on their own -- spontaneously.Many of the gorilla's abilities are thought to be socially acquired, including food cleaning behavior. But during a series of tests, researchers found gorillas cleaned sand from a dirty apple 75 percent of the time."In four of our five gorillas, at least one of the techniques for cleaning was similar to that observed in the wild," Damien Neadle, a researcher at the University of Birmingham, said in a news release. "Given that these two groups are culturally unconnected, it suggests that social learning is not required for this behavior to emerge."Scientists suggest their findings -- published this week in the journal PLoS One -- don't diminish t...
Seeds hold hidden treasures for future food

Seeds hold hidden treasures for future food

Science
More than 70,000 of the world's most precious seeds have been sent from the UK's Millennium Seed Bank to the Middle East, in its largest export to date.The consignment contains more than 50 wild relatives of cultivated crops, such as wheat, barley and lentils.The seeds will be used for food security research at a seed bank in Lebanon, which is recreating collections destroyed in Syria.The Millennium Seed Bank at Kew is the world's largest wild plant seed bank.Seeds from the resilient, wild cousins of modern food crops are being collected and stored in an international effort.The aim is to breed new crop varieties capable of withstanding threats such as climate change, drought, pests and diseases.''The real importance of these crop wild relatives is that in order to survive in the world the...
These Are the Healthiest Fast Food Salads to Order

These Are the Healthiest Fast Food Salads to Order

Health
Even our dietitians eat these when they're on the road. This article originally appeared on HelloGiggles.com.For the food-obsessed (and particularly those that seek out healthier fare), traveling can leave you feeling “meh” about mealtimes. We’re talking about the actual act of traveling—via trains, planes, and automobiles—where you’re often grabbing something quick at the airport or train station, or pulling over at a highway rest stop.There are so many choices out there, but finding a fast food meal that’s both delicious and healthy-ish can be a challenge. We were curious and wanted answers—and, of course, we wanted to help you, too. So we honed in on salads, which tend to have a health halo (meaning they seem healthy, but can be stealthily high in calories and
Inflation steady at 3% despite food cost rise

Inflation steady at 3% despite food cost rise

Business
The rate of inflation remained static at 3% in October - defying expectations of a rise among economists and policymakers at the Bank of England.The Office for National Statistics (ONS) said rising food prices were largely offset by falling fuel costs last month.Forecasters had predicted an increase to at least 3.1% - a scenario that would have forced the Bank's governor to write to the Chancellor to explain why the Consumer Prices Index measure had exceeded 3%.Its inflation target is 2%. The Bank raised interest rates earlier this month to help tackle inflation in its belief the figure was to hit 3.2% in October.The ONS figures are likely to reinforce doubts among some economists on the wisdom of that rate hike, which has forced up many families' borrowing costs at a time when their spen...
Stonehenge builders 'ate food from Scotland'

Stonehenge builders 'ate food from Scotland'

Science
The "army of builders" of Stonehenge ate animals brought from as far away as the north east of Scotland, according to a new exhibition at the famous Neolithic site in Wiltshire.Analysis of pig and cattle teeth has revealed some of the animals were from as far as 500 miles away.The "Feast! Food at Stonehenge" exhibition includes the skull of an aurochs, an extinct species of cattle.It is aimed at allowing visitors to explore diet from 4,500 years ago.English Heritage historian Susan Greany said: "Our exhibition explores the important role feasts and food played at Stonehenge."Raising the ancient stones was an incredible feat but so too was feeding the army of builders."Our exhibition reveals just how this was done."The displays reveal research and stories from a "feeding Stonehenge" project...