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Tag: forests

To improve children's diets, conserve forests

To improve children's diets, conserve forests

Science
Aug. 17 (UPI) -- According to new research, children who live closer to forests are more likely to eat healthier, more nutritious foods. The findings are the latest to link forest conservation to human health. Several studies have linked proximity forests, trees and green space with positive human health and behavior outcomes. "The data show that forests aren't just correlated with improvements in people's diets," Ranaivo Rasolofoson, a scientist at the University of Vermont, said in a news release. "We show that forests cause these improvements." In developing countries, some argue trees must make way for farms and gardens to boost nutrition. But the latests findings, published this week in the journal Science Advances, suggest the opposite. Many children in developing countries consume...
UN report urges nations to take better care of world's forests

UN report urges nations to take better care of world's forests

Science
July 6 (UPI) -- A United Nations agricultural report Friday urges world governments to better manage shrinking forests, end deforestation and restore those that have been degraded. The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization's State of the World's Forests report said in addition to shade, absorption of carbon dioxide, animal habitation and lumber, forests provide about 20 percent of rural household income in developing countries. It said forests are also responsible for providing fuel, to heat and cook, for one-third of the global population. "Deforestation, chiefly caused by the conversion of forest land to agriculture and livestock areas, threatens not only the livelihoods of foresters, forest communities and indigenous peoples, but also the variety of life on our planet," the report sa...
Forest health on one coast can affect forests on the other coast

Forest health on one coast can affect forests on the other coast

Science
May 16 (UPI) -- Shrinking forests don't just have local or regional consequences. New research suggests the loss of forests on one coast can affect forest health on the opposite coast. In a new study, published this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters, scientists at the University of Washington detailed the linked fates of forests on the East and West coasts of the United States. Die-offs on one coast, whether caused by wildfire, drought or disease -- or some combination thereof -- can have a measurable impact on the health of sections of forest a few thousand miles away. "These smaller areas of forest can have continental-scale impacts, and we really need to be considering this when we're thinking about ecological changes," Abigail Swann, an assistant professor of atmosph...