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Tag: forests

Study highlights carbon sequestration services provided by U.S. forests

Study highlights carbon sequestration services provided by U.S. forests

Science
Sept. 21 (UPI) -- Forests in the United States currently sequester approximately three decades worth of carbon dioxide emitted by the American fossil fuel industry, according to a new a study. What's more, forests and harvested wood products uptake approximately 14 percent of economy-wide CO2 emissions in the United States annually. Advertisement Despite declining carbon emissions in the United States, the contribution of forests to emissions offsets has remained stable. This, researchers say, suggests the ability of U.S. forests to absorb new carbon -- an ability driven largely by forest regrowth -- is slowly declining. To better understand the ability of afforestation and reforestation activities to improve carbon sequestration capabilities, researchers analyzed data from more than 130,...
Trees in forests all over the world are getting younger, shorter

Trees in forests all over the world are getting younger, shorter

Science
May 29 (UPI) -- Trees in forests around the world are getting younger and shorter as a result of human-caused climate change and other environmental stressors. New research, published Friday in the journal Science, suggests rising global temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last century, combined with an uptick in environmental stress and extreme weather events, have significantly altered the makeup of the planet's forests. Advertisement The changes have left old growth forests especially vulnerable. For the study, researchers recorded satellite measurements of global forests and completed a survey of the scientific literature on forest health over the last several decades. Their efforts showed increases in tree mortality have left many forests dominated by younger, sh...
Ancient long-lived pioneer trees store majority of carbon in tropical forests

Ancient long-lived pioneer trees store majority of carbon in tropical forests

Science
April 10 (UPI) -- Trees that grow fast, live long and reproduce slowly, known as long-lived pioneers, store the majority of carbon found in tropical forests. Scientists arrived at their discovery after analyzing the different development strategies used by various tree species. "In an earlier study we found that trees pursue different strategies during their development, and those strategies can be classified according to two independent criteria," lead study author Nadja Rüger, a scientist with the German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research, told UPI. Some tree species, scientists found, grow fast and die young. Other species grow slow and reach old age. Different tree species also achieve different statures. Fertility also influences a trees' development pattern. Some trees g
Nottingham Forest’s automatic promotion hopes suffer blow with draw at Middlesbrough

Nottingham Forest’s automatic promotion hopes suffer blow with draw at Middlesbrough

Sports
Lewis Grabban’s 17th goal of the season rescued a 2-2 draw for promotion-chasing Nottingham Forest at struggling Middlesbrough in the Championship.Grabban levelled with four minutes remaining despite claims from Boro that the striker had fouled goalkeeper Aynsley Pears. Getty Images - Getty Sabri Lamouchi’s Nottingham Forest will be disappointed with a draw The hosts had appeared on course to move out of the bottom three with a first win in 10 games after responding to Ryan Yates’ 29th-minute opener with two goals in four minutes through Rudy Gestede and Lewis Wing. But Grabban’s intervention kept Jonathan Woodgate’s side in the relegation zone and saw Forest edge to within eight points of second-place Leeds in the race for promotion to the Premier League.

As forests burn around the world, drinking water is at risk

Technology
Fabric curtains stretch across the huge Warragamba Dam to trap ash and sediment expected to wash off wildfire-scorched slopes and into the reservoir that holds 80% of untreated drinking water for the Greater Sydney area. In Australia's national capital of Canberra, where a state of emergency was declared on Friday because of an out-of-control forest fire to its south, authorities are hoping a new water treatment plant and other measures will prevent a repeat of water quality problems and disruption that followed deadly wildfires 17 years ago. There have not yet been major impacts on drinking water systems in southeast Australia from the intense fires that have burned more than 40,000 square miles (104,000 square kilometers) since September. But authorities know from experience that the bi...