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Toronto Film Festival: Hate U Give lead found casting criticism ‘hard’

Toronto Film Festival: Hate U Give lead found casting criticism ‘hard’

Entertainment
The star of the film version of novel The Hate U Give has admitted she found it hard to have her casting queried because she is not darker-skinned."It was the first time in my life that I'd ever had my blackness questioned," Amandla Stenberg told reporters at the Toronto Film Festival."I've never thought of myself as not being black enough," she went on.The film tells of a girl who witnesses the fatal shooting of an unarmed friend by a white police officer.The incident makes her question her place in both her predominantly black community and the private school where she is one of few non-white students.She also faces opposition over her determination to testify against the police officer responsible.Last month the artist who ill...
Earliest evidence of cheese-making in the Mediterranean found along Croatian coast

Earliest evidence of cheese-making in the Mediterranean found along Croatian coast

Science
Sept. 5 (UPI) -- Scientists have discovered the earliest evidence of cheese-making in the Mediterranean along Croatia's Dalmatian Coast. Fatty residue left on the insides of ancient pottery suggests the people of the Middle Neolithic were making cheese as early as 7,200 years ago. "This pushes back cheese-making by 4,000 years," Sarah B. McClure, an associate professor of anthropology at Penn State University, said in a news release. As confirmed by the new analysis, the emergence of cheese-making corresponded with a shift in pottery technology. "Cheese production is important enough that people are making new types of kitchenware," said McClure. "We are seeing that cultural shift." During the Early Neolithic, populations along the Dalmatian Coast produced "impressed ware" pottery. But d...
Study: High concentrations of heavy metals found in baby foods

Study: High concentrations of heavy metals found in baby foods

Health
Aug. 17 (UPI) -- Two-thirds of the baby foods tested by Consumer Reports had a troubling cadmium, inorganic arsenic or lead content, a study by the review company showed. The non-governmental organization tested 50 brand name baby foods and found "worrisome" levels of heavy metals in 68 percent of those tested. Ingesting the metals can, over time, impair cognitive function in babies and children. Cadmium, arsenic and lead are regarded, with mercury, as the most harmful to health. The report said every product tested had a measurable level of at least one heavy metal, and 15 of the 50 tested could pose health risks to a child regularly eating just one serving per day. The study also noted foods containing rice or sweet potatoes were especially likely to have high metal levels, and organic...
Earliest galaxies found 'on our cosmic doorstep'

Earliest galaxies found 'on our cosmic doorstep'

Science
Some of the earliest galaxies to form in the Universe are sitting on our cosmic doorstep, according to a study.These faint objects close to the Milky Way could be more than 13 billion years old, researchers from the universities of Durham and Harvard explain.They formed upwards of a hundred million years after the Big Bang and contained some of the first stars to light up the cosmos.The findings are published in the Astrophysical Journal.Our own galaxy, the Milky Way, is one of billions out there in the Universe. These sprawling cosmic neighbourhoods filled with stars and planets formed when many smaller building blocks - such as these galaxies - collided and merged. The discovery opens a window into what the Universe was like mo...
New 'zombie' gene found in elephants could help humans fight cancer

New 'zombie' gene found in elephants could help humans fight cancer

Health
They may not be the fastest or the smartest or even the scariest, but when it comes to beating cancer, elephants are the superheroes of the living world. It's a phenomenon that has baffled scientists since the 1970s. After all, at their size, they should have a much higher rate of the disease. The larger a living thing, the more the cells, and the more the cells, the more chance one of them turns out to be cancerous -- which is why tall people are more vulnerable to the disease than short people and why Marmaduke is much more likely to get cancer than the Taco Bell Chihuahua. And yet, cancer rates among elephants is less than 5 percent, comparable to the rates in much smaller animals. The lifetime cancer mortality rate for humans is about 20 percent. So what gives? With all those cells...