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Tag: funding

Lord Kerslake resigns in NHS funding protest

Lord Kerslake resigns in NHS funding protest

Health
Lord Kerslake has resigned as the chairman of a major London hospital trust because of NHS funding problems.The former head of the civil service says the government is being unrealistic about the challenges facing the health service.He announced he was stepping down as chairman of King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust on Sunday.NHS Improvement described the hospital's financial performance as "unacceptable".A spokeswoman added: "It is the worst in the NHS and continues to deteriorate."If you can't see the NHS Tracker, click or tap here. In a statement, Lord Kerslake said of his decision to quit: "I do not do this lightly as I love King's but believe the government and regulator are unrealistic about the scale of the challenge facing the NHS and the trust."I want to pay tribute to th...
Science funding: Will 'picking winners' work?

Science funding: Will 'picking winners' work?

Science
An ambitious Conservative minister has set out a strategy to turn the UK's scientific expertise into new products and services that will generate jobs and wealth for the economy. That was in 1983. The minister was Kenneth Clarke, who launched the £350m Alvey programme. It was designed to propel Britain to the forefront of advanced computing. But the policy of government subsidies for the research and development of favoured companies - known as "picking winners" - did not fit in with Margaret Thatcher's policy of introducing free market principles to the economy. Five years after its inception, the government pulled the plug on the Alvey programme.Thirty five years on, another Mr Clark, the Business Secretary, Greg Clark, announced £140m to support collaboration between industry and academ
Social Security expansion is possible despite future funding woes, advocates say

Social Security expansion is possible despite future funding woes, advocates say

Finance
Advocates for increasing Social Security's benefits are counting on today's release of the annual trustees report to provide some fodder for their cause.While the yearly analysis confirmed the program's long-term funding woes, proponents for expansion say it also proves the government can afford it."The numbers make it clear that the question about whether to expand or cut Social Security is a question of values, not affordability," said Nancy Altman, president of Social Security Works and chair of the Strengthen Social Security Coalition.The report, released this afternoon, echoed last year's projected revenue shortfalls starting in the mid-2020s and leading to a depleted surplus by 2035. At that point, unless Congress has taken steps to shore it up, the program will be able to fund about...