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Tag: gains

Markets rebound as Dow gains 116 points, tech stocks propel Nasdaq higher

Markets rebound as Dow gains 116 points, tech stocks propel Nasdaq higher

Business
Jan. 19 (UPI) -- The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose more than 100 points as major indexes rebounded from losses last week. The blue-chip index climbed 116.26 points, or 0.38%, the S&P 500 gained 0.81% and the Nasdaq Composite ended the day up 1.53%. Advertisement Tech stocks helped to propel the Nasdaq higher as Facebook gained 3.87%, Alphabet increased 3.29%, Microsoft rose 1.78%, Apple grew 0.54% and Amazon closed up 0.53%. Markets also responded to comments by Janet Yellen, President-elect Joe Biden's nominee for treasury secretary, during her Senate confirmation hearing. Yellen called for the federal government to take further action to boost the economy hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. "Neither the president-elect, nor I, propose this relief package without an appreciation for th...

Economically sensitive stocks are ‘spring-loaded’ for gains despite slowdown jitters, top investor Jeff Mills says

Finance
Bryn Mawr Trust's Jeff Mills sees the recovery hitting major speed bumps tied to the new wave of lockdowns.But the top investor refuses to turn bearish on economically sensitive stocks — even if GDP turns negative."The market is telling us it's going to look past the slowdown that we're going to experience in the first quarter," the firm's chief investment officer told CNBC's "Trading Nation" on Friday. "Small has outpaced large. Value, industrials, banks [and] interest rates have held in there."Last week, JPMorgan became the first major Wall Street firm to warn investors first quarter GDP will come in negative. It cited the economic fallout caused by coronavirus infections and lockdowns. However, the firm also noted the vaccine advancements would pave the way for a brisk economic expansio...

Stock futures open higher as S&P 500 tries to build on last week’s gains and reach all-time high

Finance
Traders work during the closing bell at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on March 17, 2020 at Wall Street in New York City.Johannes Eisele | AFP | Getty ImagesU.S. stock futures rose on Sunday night after Wall Street logged in its third consecutive weekly gain, but fell short of breaking the all-time high set on Feb. 19.Dow Jones Industrial Average futures were up 48 points, or 0.2%. S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures also traded higher by 0.2% each. The S&P 500 climbed 0.6% last week and the Nasdaq Composite advanced 0.1%. The Dow gained 1.8% last week.Despite those gains, the S&P 500 failed to notch a fresh record high after flirting with the milestone for most of last week. Through Friday's close, the S&P 500 was just 0.6% below 3,393.52, the intraday record set in Fe...
Stock futures extend gains following Tuesday’s rally

Stock futures extend gains following Tuesday’s rally

Finance
U.S. stock futures suggested the market would continue to move higher on Wednesday, following a big rally in the previous session that was fueled by a growing belief the worst may be over for the world's largest economy.Dow futures indicated a gain of about 70 points at the open. S&P 500 and Nasdaq-100 futures also pointed to a higher open.U.S. equities rallied on Tuesday, helped by a bevy of bullish news, including a historic jump in retail sales. The U.S. government reported a record 17.7% increase in retail sales for May. Stocks were also helped by a Bloomberg News report that the Trump administration is preparing a near $ 1 trillion infrastructure bill. Positive trial results showed dexamethasone — a widely available drug — can help critically ill coronavirus patient...
Moratorium plan: Borrowers unlikely to get significant gains; banks to charge interest later

Moratorium plan: Borrowers unlikely to get significant gains; banks to charge interest later

Finance
NEW DELHI: The three-month suspension of EMI payments may not result in a significant gains for borrowers as they will charge interest for the moratorium period, according to the moratorium scheme announced by state-owned banks. Last Friday, the RBI had announced that all term loans, including retail and crop loans and working capital payments, will be covered by the three-month moratorium. Banks will now have discretion in deciding the limits on working capital, with RBI saying that no payment miss should be considered a default and reported to credit information companies. It seems like a double whammy for the borrowers as on one side income has been hit due to COVID-19 pandemic and on the other hand there is a threat of increased tenure if they opt for RBI relief measure. In a note to...