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'Sustained' drone attack closed Gatwick, airport says

'Sustained' drone attack closed Gatwick, airport says

Business
Sussex Police, the government and Gatwick airport say that the severe travel disruption last year was caused by a "sustained" drone attack.The situation caused disruption for tens of thousands of passengers. Gatwick's decision to close was taken after a risk assessment with police. The airport says there were well over 100 drone sightings over three days.The majority of those sightings were made by police officers or airport workers.Former army officer Richard Gill believes the Gatwick attack was "really well planned".His Nottinghamshire company, Drone Defence, sells systems used to detect drones, as well as other equipment which can jam the frequencies they need to operate.'Difficult to combat'Because they were "very difficult to detect", the drones at G...
Gatwick drone inquiry: 93 'credible sightings'

Gatwick drone inquiry: 93 'credible sightings'

Technology
"Numerous instances" of illegal drone activity at Gatwick led to the airport being shut in the run-up to Christmas and it was not a police drone, according to Sussex's top officer. Chief constable Giles York appeared to try to clarify earlier comments in which he said some of the drones spotted near the hub during the festive disruption may have belonged to police.He said his force was using "all available resource" to identify and bring to justice those involved in the incident.Officers are looking into "relevant sightings" by 115 witnesses, including 93 from "credible witnesses" such as a pilot, airport staff and police officers.Police have searched 26 potential launch sites near the airport, but have not located the device that disrupted about 1,000 flights on 19 and 20 ...
Ministers to discuss Gatwick drone drama as suspects released

Ministers to discuss Gatwick drone drama as suspects released

Technology
The Gatwick Airport drone drama which grounded hundreds of flights will be discussed by ministers in a Christmas Eve conference call.Sussex Police insisted it was not "back to square one" after releasing an arrested man and woman without charge.It said it was investigating 67 drone sightings but had earlier raised the possibility there may have been no drone at all. Gatwick said there had been "multiple sightings" of the equipment.Around 1,000 flights were cancelled or diverted across three days last week after drones were reportedly spotted inside the perimeter of the UK's second biggest airport. Labour calls for inquiry into Gatwick drones How can a drone cause so much chaos? A 47-year-old man and a 54-year-old woman were relea...
Gatwick airport: How countries counter the drone threat

Gatwick airport: How countries counter the drone threat

Technology
Rogue drones "deliberately" flown over one of the UK's busiest airports caused travel chaos this week.Incoming planes were forced to divert to airports up and down the country as the drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), repeatedly appeared over the airfield at London's Gatwick Airport.The situation was so serious the Army was called in to support the local police in tackling the issue, with the runway finally re-opening on Friday morning.For some time now, governments around the world have been looking at different ways of addressing the dangers of drone use in areas where they pose safety risks. Here we look at some of the solutions - ranging from bazookas to eagles.Radar and 'jamming' systems ...
Gatwick disruption: How will police catch the drone menace?

Gatwick disruption: How will police catch the drone menace?

Technology
Police say they are still searching for those responsible for the unprecedented disruption at Gatwick Airport.But the drones that were flown over the airfield have not been captured and have not been seen since Thursday night. Endangering the safety of an aircraft is a criminal offence that can carry a prison sentence.So how will police find those responsible?Tracking the controllerIf the drones were being operated by a typical remote control unit, it would be possible to establish the controller's position.Police could pick up the controller's radio signal and "drive around and look where the signals are coming from", said cyber-security expert Prof Alan Woodward from the University of Surrey.That would only be possible if the drones were being controlle...