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Tag: genes

Cells and their genes continue to function after death, study proves

Cells and their genes continue to function after death, study proves

Science
Feb. 13 (UPI) -- Even after you die, your body's cells will continue to function. According to a new study published in the journal Nature Communications, the body's cells host post-mortem genetic expression for 24 to 48 hours.All of the biological functions that make life possible are powered by our genes -- and specifically, the expression of those genes. Recently, an international team of scientists observed genetic activity in post-mortem cells.Genes and genetic activity are defined by two types of code, DNA and RNA. DNA are the instructions, while RNA acts as the interpreter. RNA "expresses" the DNA, reading the code and translating it into action -- or biological functions.When humans suffer diseases, it is often caused by a disruption of the genetic translation and expression proces...
Genes remain active after death

Genes remain active after death

Science
Cells continue to function even after an individual dies.That's according to a scientific study published in Nature Communications.Analysing post-mortem samples, an international team of scientists showed that some genes became more active after death.As well as providing an important dataset for other scientists, they also hope that this can be developed into a forensic tool.Inside the cells of our bodies, life plays out under the powerful influence of our genes; their outputs controlled by a range of internal and external triggers.Understanding gene activity provides a perfect insight into what an individual cell, tissue or organ is doing, in health and in disease.Genes are locked away in the DNA present in our cells and when these are switched on, a tell-tale molecule called an RNA tran...
Researchers uncover new genes linked to congenital heart disease

Researchers uncover new genes linked to congenital heart disease

Health
Oct. 9 (UPI) -- Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital have discovered new genes associated with congenital heart disease in babies.The study, published today in Nature Genetics, identified several genetic mutations linked to congenital heart disease, or CHD.CHD is the leading cause of death from birth defects with one in every 100 babies born having CHD. Surgical advancements and care have improved the outcomes of babies born with CHD, although patients still are at elevated risk for heart complications later in life, other congenital abnormalities and neurodevelopmental deficits.Research from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium, and the Bench to Bassinet Program has uncovered genetic mutations that may be part of the underlying cause o...
In US first, scientists edit genes of human embryos

In US first, scientists edit genes of human embryos

Technology
For the first time in the United States, scientists have edited the genes of human embryos, a controversial step toward someday helping babies avoid inherited diseases. The experiment was just an exercise in science — the embryos were not allowed to develop for more than a few days and were never intended to be implanted into a womb, according to MIT Technology Review, which first reported the news. Officials at Oregon Health & Science University confirmed Thursday that the work took place there and said results would be published in a journal soon. It is thought to be the first such work in the U.S.; previous experiments like this have been reported from China. How many embryos were created and edited in the experiments has not been revealed. The Oregon scientists reportedly used a t
Why dogs are friendly – it's written in their genes

Why dogs are friendly – it's written in their genes

Science
Being friendly is in dogs' nature and could be key to how they came to share our lives, say US scientists.Dogs evolved from wolves tens of thousands of years ago.During this time, certain genes that make dogs particularly gregarious have been selected for, according to research.This may give dogs their distinctive personalities, including a craving for human company."Our finding of genetic variation in both dogs and wolves provides a possible insight into animal personality, and may even suggest similar genes may have roles in other domestic species (maybe cats even)," said Dr Bridgett vonHoldt of Princeton University.The researchers studied the behaviour of domestic dogs, and grey wolves living in captivity. They carried out a number of tests of the animals' skills at problem-solving and ...