News That Matters

Tag: genes

Skinny genes the 'secret to staying slim'

Skinny genes the 'secret to staying slim'

Health
Scientists say they have discovered the secret behind why some people are skinny while others pile on the pounds easily. Their work reveals newly discovered genetic regions linked to being very slim. The international team say this supports the idea that, for some people, being thin has more to do with inheriting a "lucky" set of genes than having a perfect diet or lifestyle. The study appears in PLOS Genetics. You may also be interested in: In the past few decades, researchers have found hundreds of genetic changes that increase the chance of a person being overweight - but there has been much less focus on the genes of people who are thin. In this investigation, scientists compared DNA samples from 1,600 healthy thin people in the UK - with a body mass ...
Are You a Coffee or a Tea Person? Your Genes May Hold the Answer

Are You a Coffee or a Tea Person? Your Genes May Hold the Answer

Health
Whether you’re a coffee or a tea person may be determined by your genes. That’s according to new research examining our perception of bitter taste and the way it affects how much of our preferred morning brew we guzzle. In the new study, published yesterday in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers analyzed genetic data from more than 400,000 UK adults between the ages of 37 and 73. They found that people who carried specific receptor genes for the bitter taste of caffeine were more likely to drink more than four cups of coffee daily and less likely to drink tea. People with different bitter rece...
Cells and their genes continue to function after death, study proves

Cells and their genes continue to function after death, study proves

Science
Feb. 13 (UPI) -- Even after you die, your body's cells will continue to function. According to a new study published in the journal Nature Communications, the body's cells host post-mortem genetic expression for 24 to 48 hours.All of the biological functions that make life possible are powered by our genes -- and specifically, the expression of those genes. Recently, an international team of scientists observed genetic activity in post-mortem cells.Genes and genetic activity are defined by two types of code, DNA and RNA. DNA are the instructions, while RNA acts as the interpreter. RNA "expresses" the DNA, reading the code and translating it into action -- or biological functions.When humans suffer diseases, it is often caused by a disruption of the genetic translation and expression proces...
Genes remain active after death

Genes remain active after death

Science
Cells continue to function even after an individual dies.That's according to a scientific study published in Nature Communications.Analysing post-mortem samples, an international team of scientists showed that some genes became more active after death.As well as providing an important dataset for other scientists, they also hope that this can be developed into a forensic tool.Inside the cells of our bodies, life plays out under the powerful influence of our genes; their outputs controlled by a range of internal and external triggers.Understanding gene activity provides a perfect insight into what an individual cell, tissue or organ is doing, in health and in disease.Genes are locked away in the DNA present in our cells and when these are switched on, a tell-tale molecule called an RNA tran...
Researchers uncover new genes linked to congenital heart disease

Researchers uncover new genes linked to congenital heart disease

Health
Oct. 9 (UPI) -- Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital have discovered new genes associated with congenital heart disease in babies.The study, published today in Nature Genetics, identified several genetic mutations linked to congenital heart disease, or CHD.CHD is the leading cause of death from birth defects with one in every 100 babies born having CHD. Surgical advancements and care have improved the outcomes of babies born with CHD, although patients still are at elevated risk for heart complications later in life, other congenital abnormalities and neurodevelopmental deficits.Research from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium, and the Bench to Bassinet Program has uncovered genetic mutations that may be part of the underlying cause o...