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Tag: Genetic

Genetic score can identify infants at risk for type 1 diabetes

Genetic score can identify infants at risk for type 1 diabetes

Health
April 2 (UPI) -- Researchers have developed a genetics score that can identify infants at risk for type 1 diabetes, according to a new study.The scientists calculated genetic scores from more than 30 genes among 3,498 children with no family history of type 1 diabetes but with gene variants known to convey type 1 diabetes risk. Their findings were published Tuesday in PLOS Medicine.In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas isn't making insulin or is making very little of the hormone. Insulin enables blood sugar to enter the cells in the body and be converted for use as energy. To make up for the insulin, type 1 diabetics need insulin shots or an insulin pump.It's usually diagnosed in children, teens and young adults, but it can develop at any age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Pr...
Hospitals 'failing' on genetic bowel cancer test

Hospitals 'failing' on genetic bowel cancer test

Health
More than 80% of NHS hospitals in England are failing to test bowel cancer patients for the genetic condition Lynch syndrome, according to the charity Bowel Cancer UK.The condition increases the risk of bowel and other cancers. Bowel Cancer UK estimates that 166,000 people in the UK are unaware that they have the condition.An NHS England spokeswoman said there are clear guidelines about when it is appropriate to test for Lynch syndrome. Testing for the syndrome can guide the treatment of the patient and indicates whether their families are at risk. Children of people with the condition have a 50/50 chance of developing it.The charity says it is important to find out whether patients have Lynch syndrome, because some chemotherapy drugs are ineffective for them.And if other family members fi...
Genetic mutation from father may speed onset of ovarian cancer

Genetic mutation from father may speed onset of ovarian cancer

Health
Feb. 16 (UPI) -- A genetic mutation linked to sped up onset of ovarian and prostate cancers, and passed through the X-chromosome, has been identified by researchers.The mutation can also advance the start of ovarian cancer by six or more years, researchers at the Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center in Buffalo said. Their findings appeared in the journal PLOS Genetics on Thursday.Earlier studies showed that when a woman develops ovarian cancer, her sister also faces a higher risk of developing the disease than her mother. The studies led to an examination by researchers of whether genes on the X-chromosome, passed down through the father, may contribute to a daughter's risk of ovarian cancer.Using the donor-funded Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry based at Roswell Park, the researchers ...
Study: Genetic indicators help determine COPD risk

Study: Genetic indicators help determine COPD risk

Health
Jan. 16 (UPI) -- Researchers found in study published Tuesday that genetic variations in lungs can help identify people at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, which is often caused by cigarette smoke and pollution.The study -- funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, which is part of the National Institutes of Health -- identified people with low, but stable, lung function early in life who developed COPD.For the study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists were attempting to learn why not all smokers develop COPD, but many non-smokers do."This work raises many interesting questions for researchers. Understanding precisely why these genes influence the development of COPD may lead to entirely new and more ...
Study reveals dramatic loss of genetic diversity among Columbia River Chinook salmon

Study reveals dramatic loss of genetic diversity among Columbia River Chinook salmon

Science
Jan. 10 (UPI) -- Genetic diversity helps species survive and adapt to changing environmental conditions. Unfortunately for the Columbia River Chinook salmon, the species has lost nearly two-thirds of its genetic diversity.Scientists at Washington State University collected and analyzed DNA samples from salmon found in the Snake and Columbia rivers. They compared their genome to DNA samples from salmon bones dating to 7,000 years ago.The results -- published this week in the journal PLOS One -- show the salmon has experienced a dramatic decline in genetic diversity.Researchers aren't sure what's driving the decline but believe the arrival of European settlers in the 1800s played a significant role."The big question is: Is it the dams or was it this huge fishing pressure when Europeans arriv...