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Mobile masts giant Arqiva eyes £6bn float

Mobile masts giant Arqiva eyes £6bn float

Business
The communications infrastructure giant which owns thousands of mobile‎ phone masts across Britain has lined up a quartet of banks to prepare a bumper London stock market listing.Sky News has learnt that Arqiva, which is owned by a consortium of Australian and Canadian investors, has appointed Barclays, Goldman Sachs, HSBC and JP Morgan to oversee the plan.The recruitment of the syndicate of banks comes as Arqiva's existing shareholders hold talks with a number of infrastructure investors which have expresed buying the company.The so-called dual-track process - which could result in either a float or a sale of Arqiva - is at an early stage and may not be concluded until next year.Arqiva operates more than 8,000 sites across the UK‎, with its mobile masts used by customers including EE, O2 ...
Iowa group sues United over death of giant rabbit

Iowa group sues United over death of giant rabbit

World
A group of Iowa businessmen filed a lawsuit Wednesday against United Airlines over the death of Simon, a giant rabbit whose lifeless body was discovered in a kennel after a flight from London to Chicago. The lawsuit comes as United struggles to repair its image after a string of events, including the videotaped forced removal of a 69-year-old doctor from a plane at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport and the banning of two young girls from a flight because they were wearing leggings. The businessmen filed the lawsuit more than three months after airline workers found the continental rabbit dead on April 20. Simon had been placed in a United kennel at O'Hare while awaiting a connecting flight to Kansas City, where his new owners planned to pick him up. The lawsuit seeks unspecified dama...
NASA to fly spacecraft over giant Jupiter storm

NASA to fly spacecraft over giant Jupiter storm

Technology
NASA is preparing to fly its Juno spacecraft over a huge storm which has been raging on Jupiter for up to 350 years.The planet's Great Red Spot is a 10,000-mile wide storm that has been monitored since 1830, but which scientists think actually formed centuries earlier.Image:The Great Red Spot is Jupiter's best-known feature. Pic: NASAJuno will pass 5,600 miles above the storm on Monday, with all eight of the craft's instruments and its camera, known as 'Junocam', in operation during the flyby.The spacecraft's principal investigator Scott Bolton, from the Southwest Research Institute, said: "Jupiter's mysterious Great Red Spot is probably the best-known feature of Jupiter."This monumental storm has raged on the solar system's biggest planet for centuries. Now, Juno and her cloud-penetrating...