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Tag: Global

Increase in size, frequency of ocean storms a threat to global fisheries

Increase in size, frequency of ocean storms a threat to global fisheries

Science
June 25 (UPI) -- Fishermen around the world will face an influx of larger, more powerful ocean storms, new research suggests. In an effort to understand how global warming and its resulting shifts in weather patterns could influence global fisheries, scientists at the University of Exeter analyzed predictions made by a variety of climate change models. Many studies have suggested rising atmospheric and ocean temperatures, as well as a slowdown in atmospheric currents, will inspire more frequent and larger storms, especially ocean and coastal storms. The latest study -- published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change -- showed an uptick in large storms is likely to make fishing more dangerous. Larger storms could also damage fish habitat and disrupt fish breeding grounds. "Storms ar...
Global warming linked with rising antibiotic resistance

Global warming linked with rising antibiotic resistance

Science
May 21 (UPI) -- New research suggests rising temperatures are encouraging antibiotic resistance in cities across the United States. Until now, health researchers assumed antibiotic resistance was primarily the result of overprescription and overuse. But a new study suggests climate change is also to blame. "The effects of climate are increasingly being recognized in a variety of infectious diseases, but so far as we know this is the first time it has been implicated in the distribution of antibiotic resistance over geographies," Derek MacFadden, an infectious disease specialist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital, said in a news release. "We also found a signal that the associations between antibiotic resistance and temperature could be increasing over time." MacFadden and ...
WHO: Congo Ebola not a global health emergency

WHO: Congo Ebola not a global health emergency

World
May 19 (UPI) -- Two more cases of Ebola have been confirmed in the Democratic Republic of Congo city of Mbandaka, bringing the total to three. Despite more breakouts, The World Health Organization on Friday said the crisis being labeled an international health emergency is not warranted. The new cases of Ebola in the Congo take the number of suspected infections to 43, according to the health minister. Outbreaks were previously reported in remote areas. Friday's meeting was called because Mbandaka is a sprawling city of 1.2 million people, and also because the city sits on the banks of the Congo River and is a major trade thoroughfare. Nine neighboring countries, including Congo-Brazzaville and Central African Republic, have been advised they are at high risk of spread for the disease, a...
'Feel good' factor not CO2 boosts global forest expansion

'Feel good' factor not CO2 boosts global forest expansion

Science
Forests are increasing around the world because of rising incomes and an improved sense of national wellbeing say researchers.The authors refute the idea that increasing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere are the key cause of the spread of trees. As countries become better off, farmers focus on good quality soils and abandon marginal lands, the authors say.As a result, trees are able to rapidly reforest these deserted areas.The study highlights the fact that between 1990 and 2015 forest growing stock increased annually by 1.31% in high income countries and by 0.5% in middle income nations, while falling by 0.72% in 22 low income countries. Several global climate models have attributed this change to what's termed CO2 fertilisation -...
Global warming 'led to the start of the human race'

Global warming 'led to the start of the human race'

Technology
Global warming during a "greenhouse interval" ultimately led to the start of the human race, scientists believe.New research suggests that sea temperatures of around 25C (77F) and a lack of permanent polar ice sheets fuelled an explosion of species diversity that eventually led to the human race.Scientists made the discovery while looking for clues in tiny fossil shells in blocks of Shropshire limestone thought to be around 510 million years old.The timeframe is referred to as the Cambrian explosion, when representatives of all the major animal groups first appeared.The surge in diversity allowed life to evolve into a multitude of complex forms, including fish, reptiles, birds and mammals.Scientists previously thought the Cambrian explosion must have been fuelled by warm temperatures, but ...