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Tag: Global

Deutsche Bank staff pack up as global cull of 18,000 jobs begins

Deutsche Bank staff pack up as global cull of 18,000 jobs begins

Business
By John-Paul Ford Rojas, business reporter Deutsche Bank has begun the process of culling 18,000 staff worldwide, with members of its 8,000-strong UK workforce among those facing the axe.The German lender is scaling back its investment banking division - which has its biggest centre in London - as part of the plans to cut a fifth of its global headcount. Chief executive Christian Sewing declined to give a breakdown of where the jobs axe would fall, but insisted that London would remain a "critical part" of its plans.Staff in Sydney, Hong Kong and elsewhere in Asia were the first to learn that they were set to lose their jobs, as the global working day began.Later, an IT worker in London told the Reuters news agency: "I was terminated this morning. Ther...
US top of the garbage pile in global waste crisis

US top of the garbage pile in global waste crisis

Science
The world produces over two billion tonnes of municipal solid waste every year, enough to fill over 800,000 Olympic sized swimming pools.Per head of population the worst offenders are the US, as Americans produce three times the global average of waste, including plastic and food. When it comes to recycling, America again lags behind other countries, only re-using 35% of solid waste. Germany is the most efficient country, recycling 68% of material. Philippines sends tonnes of rubbish back to Canada Glastonbury clean-up under way The study has been compiled by Verisk Maplecroft, a research firm that specialises in global risk, They've developed two new indices, on waste generation and recycling. They've used publically-available ...
Rise in global sea levels could have ‘profound consequences’

Rise in global sea levels could have ‘profound consequences’

World
Media playback is unsupported on your device Scientists believe that global sea levels could rise far more than predicted, due to accelerating melting in Greenland and Antarctica.The long-held view has been that the world's seas would rise by a maximum of just under a metre by 2100.This new study, based on expert opinions, projects that the real level may be around double that figure. This could lead to the displacement of hundreds of millions of people, the authors say. The question of sea-level rise was one of the most controversial issues raised by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), when it published its fifth assessment report in 2013. It said the continued warming of the planet, without major reductions in emissions, wo...