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Tag: gold

Jim Ratcliffe: Turning cast-offs into gold

Jim Ratcliffe: Turning cast-offs into gold

Business
Jim Ratcliffe may once have been called Dr No by trade unions for his tough negotiating stance, but the UK's richest man champions the unloved.Through buying up and turning around the cast-off parts of big business, the Mancunian has made his £21bn fortune.From operations once owned by the likes of oil giant BP, Mr Ratcliffe has created a company whose chemicals and raw materials go into nearly everything we touch everyday. And it only took him 20 years to do it.Mr Ratcliffe, 65, has always been involved in chemicals and industry.After graduating with a degree in chemical engineering from the University of Birmingham in 1974, he spent a very brief spell at BP before jumping to rival oil business Esso as a trainee accountant. Son of a joiner becomes...
Winter Paralympics: Britons Menna Fitzpatrick & Jen Kehoe win slalom gold

Winter Paralympics: Britons Menna Fitzpatrick & Jen Kehoe win slalom gold

Sports
Winter Paralympics on the BBCVenue: Pyeongchang, South Korea Dates: 9-18 March Time in Pyeongchang: GMT +9Coverage: Follow on Radio 5 live and via the BBC Sport website. Television coverage on Channel 4.Britain's Menna Fitzpatrick and guide Jen Kehoe won gold in the women's visually-impaired slalom at the Winter Paralympics in Pyeongchang.The pair, who had already won two silvers and a bronze in South Korea, beat Slovakia's Henrieta Farkasova and Natalia Subrtova by 0.66 seconds.It is GB's first gold of these Games and only their second Winter Paralympic gold."We wanted to show what we are capable of," Fitzpatrick told BBC Sport."I am so proud of what we did out there."Millie Knight and Brett Wild won bronze for GB to add to their two silvers in the downhill and super-G.Kelly Gallagher, wh...
Cheltenham Festival: Native River romps to Gold Cup success

Cheltenham Festival: Native River romps to Gold Cup success

Sports
Native River won a thrilling Cheltenham Gold Cup after an epic duel with Might Bite.The 5-1 chance gave Dorset trainer Colin Tizzard his first victory in the race after some spectacular jumping under champion jockey Richard Johnson.Favourite Might Bite (4-1), seeking a historic Cheltenham Festival treble for trainer Nicky Henderson, was a gallant runner-up, beaten by four and a half lengths.Anibale Fly (33-1) finished third ahead of Road To Respect and Djakadam.Read more: 'Tizzard gives Cheltenham a gold top'Podcast: 'A Gold Cup that lived up to the hype'Read more: Jockey wins despite dislocated shoulderBut the race was all about the memorable battle between last year's third-placed horse Native River and King George VI Chase winner Might Bite.The pair led from the front, roared on by a se...
Turkey freezes assets of gold trader testifying in U.S. sanctions case

Turkey freezes assets of gold trader testifying in U.S. sanctions case

World
Dec. 1 (UPI) -- Turkish prosecutors ordered the assets of gold trader Reza Zarrab to be seized Friday as he testified in Manhattan on his role in a scheme to evade U.S. sanctions against Iran.The Istanbul prosecutor's office froze Zarrab's assets as well as those of his close relatives and acquaintances, Turkey's state-run Anadolu Agency reported.The Turkish-Iranian testified in U.S. court earlier this week that he bribed Turkey's former economic minister, Mehmet Zafer Caglayan, as part of a scheme to smuggle gold for oil in violation of U.S. sanctions against Iran.Zarrab, 34, became the star witness when he agreed to cooperate with U.S. authorities to describe the details of the complex sanctions-busting operation to the court.He used markers and poster-board to draw diagrams explaining h...
Scientists witness huge cosmic crash, find origins of gold

Scientists witness huge cosmic crash, find origins of gold

Technology
It was a faint signal, but it told of one of the most violent acts in the universe, and it would soon reveal secrets of the cosmos, including how gold was created. Astronomers around the world reacted to the signal quickly, focusing telescopes located on every continent and even in orbit to a distant spot in the sky. What they witnessed in mid-August and revealed Monday was the long-ago collision of two neutron stars — a phenomenon California Institute of Technology's David H. Reitze called "the most spectacular fireworks in the universe." "When these things collide, all hell breaks loose," he said. Measurements of the light and other energy emanating from the crash have helped scientists explain how planet-killing gamma ray bursts are born, how fast the universe is expanding, and where h