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Tag: graphene

Fluorine lends white graphene new qualities

Fluorine lends white graphene new qualities

Science
July 14 (UPI) -- With just a bit of fluorine, white graphene becomes a wide-bandgap semiconductor with magnetic properties. The new material could be used in electronics designed to perform under extreme conditions.White graphene is a two-dimensional atomic sheet of hexagonal boron nitride. Its hexagonal structure is similar to that of regular graphene, but the atomic layer is made up of boron nitride, a combination of boron and nitrogen atoms, instead of carbon.Although graphene is more chemically and electrically stable than graphene, allowing it to function under more extreme circumstances, like in space.But the material is typically employed as an insulator, not a semi-conductor."Boron nitride is a stable insulator and commercially very useful as a protective coating, even in cosmetics...
Flourine lends white graphene new qualities

Flourine lends white graphene new qualities

Science
July 14 (UPI) -- With just a bit of fluorine, white graphene becomes a wide-bandgap semiconductor with magnetic properties. The new material could be used in electronics designed to perform under extreme conditions.White graphene is a two-dimensional atomic sheet of hexagonal boron nitride. Its hexagonal structure is similar to that of regular graphene, but the atomic layer is made up of boron nitride, a combination of boron and nitrogen atoms, instead of carbon.Although graphene is more chemically and electrically stable than graphene, allowing it to function under more extreme circumstances, like in space.But the material is typically employed as an insulator, not a semi-conductor."Boron nitride is a stable insulator and commercially very useful as a protective coating, even in cosmetics...

Scientists 3D-print graphene foam, a first

Science
June 21 (UPI) -- A team of researchers from Texas and China have managed to create graphene foam using a 3D printer. The production method could eventually yield commercial quantities of the material.Graphene's benefits have been well-documented by material scientists. The atomically thin carbon sheets are exceptionally strong, flexible and conductive. But producing graphene in bulk has proven difficult, limiting its potential use in commercial technologies -- whether they be medical implants or smartphones.Scientists at Rice University and China's Tianjin University, however, have found a way to turn nongraphene starting materials into graphene foam using a 3D printer. Researchers detailed their breakthrough in the journal journal ACS Nano."This study is a first of its kind," Rice chemist...