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Tag: Greenland

Jakobshavn Isbrae: Mighty Greenland glacier slams on brakes

Jakobshavn Isbrae: Mighty Greenland glacier slams on brakes

Science
European satellites have detailed the abrupt change in behaviour of one of Greenland's most important glaciers.In the 2000s, Jakobshavn Isbrae was the fastest flowing ice stream on the island, travelling at 17km a year.As it sped to the ocean, its front end also retreated and thinned, dropping in height by as much as 20m year.But now it's all change. Jakobshavn is travelling much more slowly, and its trunk has even begun to thicken and lengthen."It's a complete reversal in behaviour and it wasn't predicted," said Dr Anna Hogg from Leeds University and the UK Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM)."The question now is: what's next for Jakobshavn? Is this just a pause, or is it a switch-off of the dynamic thinning we've ...
NASA studies Greenland to determine how much of it is melting

NASA studies Greenland to determine how much of it is melting

Science
March 14 (UPI) -- NASA scientists are back in Greenland to find out if encroaching ocean waves are accelerating the melting on the underside of just a few unlucky glaciers, or if the ocean poses a major threat to the entirety of the island's ice. The latest research campaign is part of NASA's Oceans Melting Greenland program. Since 2016, researchers have conducted two or three field campaigns per year. Scientists continue to look for new ways to measure the effects of ocean currents and waves on the undersides of Greenland's melting glaciers. "We've seen some really surprising results that suggest the oceans have a huge effect on Greenland's biggest glaciers," Josh Willis, principal investigator on the OMG mission and a scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in a news releas...
Study: Greenland could sell its sand, profit from melting glaciers

Study: Greenland could sell its sand, profit from melting glaciers

Science
Feb. 11 (UPI) -- As Greenland's glaciers continue to melt at an accelerated pace, meltwater rivers are depositing more and more sediment along the island's coast. If the trend continues, as most climate scientists predict, Greenland could stand to profit from warming temperatures by selling its excess sand. "Eight percent of the annual sediment contribution delivered to the global oceans comes from the Greenland Ice Sheet and with continued global warming, this number is expected to increase," Mette Bendixen, a researcher at the University of Colorado, Boulder's Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, said in a news release. Like Greenland's glaciers, the island's economy -- mostly based around commercial fishing -- is increasingly vulnerable. Selling excess sand could provide local comm...
Greenland ice melting faster than previously thought: study

Greenland ice melting faster than previously thought: study

Science
Jan. 22 (UPI) -- The Greenland Ice Sheet is melting faster than scientists had previously thought - a lot faster. According to a new study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the Greenland Ice Sheet is now melting four times faster than it had been prior to 2003, National Geographic reported. The largest amount of ice loss between 2003 to mid-2013 occurred at the southwest region of the world's largest island where few glaciers are located. Most of the ice melt came from from an area where ice loss wasn't known to occur rapidly. "We knew we had one big problem with increasing rates of ice discharge by some large outlet glaciers," Ohio State University geoscientist and lead writer on the paper Michael Bevis said. "But now we recognize a second serious p...
Greenland ice sheet hides huge 'impact crater'

Greenland ice sheet hides huge 'impact crater'

Science
What looks to be a large impact crater has been identified beneath the Greenland ice sheet. The 31km-wide depression came to light when scientists examined radar images of the island's bedrock. Investigations suggest the feature was probably dug out by a 1.5km-wide iron asteroid sometime between about 12,000 and three million years ago. But without drilling through nearly 1km of ice to sample the bed directly, scientists can't be more specific. "We will endeavour to do this; it would certainly be the best way to get the 'dead fish on the table' (acknowledge the issue, rather than leaving it), so to speak," Prof Kurt Kjær, from the Danish Museum of Natural History, told BBC News.If confirmed, the crater would be the first of...