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Scientists grow mini organs to see how coronavirus ravages the body

Scientists grow mini organs to see how coronavirus ravages the body

Technology
Scientists are growing miniature organs to see how the coronavirus attacks the body.These organoids based on lung, liver, kidney and intestine tissues reveal in a laboratory setting how the SARS-CoV-2 virus affects cells and causes so much damage. According to an article in the journal Nature, they are crucially offering researchers an invaluable opportunity to experiment with medicines which could be effective against COVID-19. Image: COVID-19 in the lungs. Pic: George Washington University Hospital Although researchers know how devastating the coronavirus can be to the body's organs, it's unclear whether some of this damage is caused by the virus directly or by the immune response it triggers.Unlike cultured cells on a dish, organoi...
Engineers grow optical chips in a Petri dish

Engineers grow optical chips in a Petri dish

Science
June 16 (UPI) -- Researchers in Russia have successfully grown optical chips in a Petri dish. The breakthrough could pave the way for a variety of smaller and more precise optical technologies. Optical chips are made of tiny lasers and waveguides. Lasers inside the optical chips currently deployed by the modern photonics industry rely on infrared emissions. Advertisement In order to build a more compact optical chip, engineers at IMTO University set out to pair microlasers and waveguides that use light in the visible spectrum. Visible light features smaller wavelengths. "The size of a chip depends on the wavelength of its emission," Sergey Makarov, chief researcher with ITMO's department of physics and engineering, said in a news release. Microlasers produce light emissions, while wavegu...
In a post-coronavirus world, China looks set to grow while the rest of the world contracts

In a post-coronavirus world, China looks set to grow while the rest of the world contracts

Finance
Red flags fly in front of the Great Hall of the People as the third session of the 13th National People's Congress (NPC) opens on May 22, 2020 in Beijing, China.Du Yang | China News Service | Getty ImagesBEIJING — The U.S.-China relationship is at a critical turning point, analysts say, and hints of what the global landscape could look like have emerged in the few days since China's annual parliamentary meeting wrapped up.The highly symbolic congress – which concluded last Thursday after nearly a week of meetings – sent a strong signal to its people that China has overcome the disease, and that business is quickly getting back to normal. Beijing also used the gathering to introduce a new security bill for the special administrative region of Hong Kong, which enjoys a semi-au
Coronavirus: Brazil overtakes Spain and Italy as new cases grow

Coronavirus: Brazil overtakes Spain and Italy as new cases grow

World
Brazil has overtaken Spain and Italy to become the country with the fourth-largest number of confirmed coronavirus infections in the world.Officials on Saturday reported 14,919 new cases in the past 24 hours, taking the total to 233,142. Only the US, Russia and the UK have higher numbers.The death toll in Brazil over 24 hours was 816, bringing the total to 15,633 - the world's fifth-highest figure.Experts warn that the real figure may be far higher due to a lack of testing.The mayor of the country's most populous city, São Paulo, warned on Sunday that the city's health system could collapse. Bruno Covas said the public hospitals in the city reached 90% capacity for emergency beds, with demand still growing.Mr Covas said he was in
To adapt to cities, birds must grow their brains or grow their families

To adapt to cities, birds must grow their brains or grow their families

Science
March 25 (UPI) -- As the planet becomes increasingly urbanized, many species, including birds, are struggling to adapt to human presence. Urbanization can drive some bird species to extinction, but others are capable of thriving in cities. New research -- published this week in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution -- suggests birds have a choice of two strategies for adapting to urban life. They can either grow bigger brains, or they can produce more offspring. Better understanding how different bird species respond to human development can help policymakers craft more effective conservation and protection plans. "Cities are harsh environments for most species and therefore often support much lower biodiversity than natural environments," lead study author Ferran Sayol, postdoc...