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Uber data hack hit 2.7m UK riders and drivers

Uber data hack hit 2.7m UK riders and drivers

Technology
Uber says the data breach it kept secret for over a year resulted in the personal data of approximately 2.7 million people in the UK being exposed.The ride-hailing app - already under pressure in this country on employment rights and the future of its operating licence in London - said it could not be sure of the figure because of the way it collects data by country.It revealed last week that the data of 57 million people worldwide was exposed by hackers in October 2016.:: Uber loses appeal over employment rights rulingVideo:Spanish taxi drivers launch strike over Uber It later emerged the company had effectively paid off the persons responsible in the belief the information - which included names, addresses and mobile phone numbers - would be deleted and not used by the criminals.Uber als...
Uber bins security chief over hack cover-up

Uber bins security chief over hack cover-up

Technology
Uber has got rid of its chief security officer and announced that his team paid off hackers who stole data belonging to 57 million users.The ride-hailing app's chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, said: "None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it."Former CSO, Joe Sullivan, presided over a loss of the names, email addresses and mobile phone numbers belonging to Uber drivers and passengers, according to Bloomberg.Mr Sullivan's team then paid the hackers $ 100,000 to delete the data instead of notifying the victims.Uber's former chief executive, Travis Kalanick, learned of the hack in 2016, according to Bloomberg - seven months before a shareholder revolt forced him to quit and replaced him with Mr Khosrowshahi."At the time of the incident, we took immediate steps to...
5 things to do right now if you're worried about the Equifax hack

5 things to do right now if you're worried about the Equifax hack

Finance
Equifax hack: What you need to knowLet's face it. There's a good chance your personal information was exposed during the Equifax data breach. The names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and driver's license numbers for 143 million people may have been accessed. That kind of information could be used by someone else to open bank accounts, credit cards and loans in your name. The credit card numbers of an additional 209,000 people were also accessed. Those people will be notified directly. Everyone else must go to a website created by Equifax and submit their last name and last six digits of their Social Security number to find out if they were affected. If you're concerned about whether your information has landed in the hands of hackers, here are five things you can do ri...
Equifax data hack 'an unmitigated disaster'

Equifax data hack 'an unmitigated disaster'

Business
A cyber attack on a credit rating agency threatening the data of up to 44 million people in the UK has been branded an "unmitigated disaster" by security experts.The response of US-based Equifax to the massive breach, in which it lost the personal information of 143 million people to hackers, has also been criticised.The hack compromised a wealth of personal data, including names, birthdays, addresses and social security numbers - as well as credit card numbers for more than 200,000 people.The firm admitted UK consumers were affected by the breach but did not say how many, however the company is understood to hold the data of 44 million British consumers.Video:Minister says it is 'incredibly important' people know how to react to hackBritish customers of companies, including BT, Capital On...
Equifax says data from 143 million Americans exposed in hack

Equifax says data from 143 million Americans exposed in hack

Technology
Credit monitoring company Equifax has been hit by a high-tech heist that exposed the social security numbers and other data of about 143 million Americans. Now those people have to worry about the threat of having their identities stolen. The Atlanta-based company said Thursday that "criminals" exploited a U.S. website application to access files between mid-May and July of this year. The theft obtained consumers' names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some cases, driver's license numbers. Such sensitive information can be enough for crooks to hijack the identities of people whose credentials were stolen through no fault of their own, potentially wreaking havoc on the victims' lives. Equifax discovered the hack July 29, but waited until Thursday to warn consumers. ...