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Tag: heart

2 high blood pressure medications added to recall of heart drug

2 high blood pressure medications added to recall of heart drug

Health
A Food and Drug Administration recall of a heart medication due to a cancer-causing chemical now includes two blood pressure medications. Teva Pharmaceuticals has issued a voluntary recall of its amlodipine/valsartan combination tablets and amlodipine/valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination tablets, both used to treat high blood pressure, according to the FDA. The FDA announced the recall on its website Tuesday. The move is due to the detection of a probable human carcinogen known as NDEA, which has been found in valsartan API, the FDA said. Valsartan API is an active pharmaceutical ingredient made by Mylan India, according to the FDA. “This chemical is typically found in very small amounts in certain foods, drinking water, air pollution, and certain industrial processes,...
Four die in Iowa plane crash after pilot aparently had heart attack

Four die in Iowa plane crash after pilot aparently had heart attack

Health
Nov. 10 (UPI) -- Four people died in a small plane crash in rural Iowa after the pilot apparently had a heart attack and a student pilot was going to attempt an emergency landing, authorities said Saturday. Around 5 p.m. Friday, air traffic control in Des Moines requested an emergency landing for a single-engine aircraft at the airport east of Guthrie Center, Guthrie County Sheriff Marty Arganbright said in a release to local media. Traffic control reported that 1979 Piper single-engine plane dropped off radar approximately 4 miles southwest of the airport. Guthrie is 60 miles west of Des Moines. The Sheriff's Office launched an extensive search and rescue mission to find the aircraft but was hampered by pitch-black conditions in forested areas. A resident reported seeing a small plane cr...
Physical activity lowers death risk from heart disease, study says

Physical activity lowers death risk from heart disease, study says

Health
Oct. 18 (UPI) -- Physical activity could lower the high rate of death associated with frailty in older people, according to a study conducted in Spain. The findings, which were published this week in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, confirm advice by geriatrics experts that physical activity helps prevent older people from developing the dangers of becoming frail: poor health, falls, disability and death. "Physical activity might partly compensate for the greater mortality risk associated with frailty in old age," the researchers concluded. Physical activity doesn't need to be strenuous, and can include walking. In previous research, physical activity has been shown to improve strength, balance, agility, walking speed and muscle mass. The researchers analyzed information f...
'Without a heart donor I might not make it'

'Without a heart donor I might not make it'

Health
Father-of-two Gareth Evans has needed a heart transplant for nine years. The 45-year-old, from Stockport, has been waiting longer than anyone else in the UK on the current list of heart transplant patients.His health is declining and, as Organ Donation Week begins, the NHS wants people to join the UK's donor register.NHS Blood and Transplant figures show about 3,000 lifesaving transplants were missed in the last year, as families would not donate relatives' organs. They also show 80% of people support organ donation, yet only 33% of people have told their family they want to donate.Gareth originally had a heart transplant in 1990, aged only 17, after he contracted cardiomyopathy, a disease of the heart muscle. The heart has laste...
Rapid heart imaging system may improve care in developing nations

Rapid heart imaging system may improve care in developing nations

Health
Aug. 29 (UPI) -- A rapid imaging system could improve heart healthcare in developing nations because of reduced costs and easier availability, according to a study in Peru. Researchers determined the new system, which uses contrast dye to measure cardiac structure, function and scarring, was effective at a fraction of the costs and time required for the traditional imaging system. The findings were published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association. In Peru, 16 percent of the population has cardiovascular disease, researchers say, but screening people there for heart conditions can be difficult. The Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging system, also called cardiac MRIs, are often not available for people in Peru and other developing nations. The method provides detailed inf...