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Strengthen muscles as well as heart to stay fit and healthy, say top doctors

Strengthen muscles as well as heart to stay fit and healthy, say top doctors

Health
Adults are advised to do muscle-strengthening exercises twice a week, as well as aerobic exercise, to help them stay active for longer, under new guidance from the UK's top doctors.For the first time, it includes advice on safe activity levels for pregnant women and new mums.Dance, bowls or Tai Chi are advised for over-65s to reduce falls in old age.Physical activity protects against obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and depression, the advice says.The new guidelines on physical activity have been produced by the UK's chief medical officers and updated to reflect the latest scientific evidence.Their message is that any activity is better than none, and more is even better. Prof Dame Sally Davies, England's chief medical off...
Purple Heart medals awarded to World War I Coast Guardsmen

Purple Heart medals awarded to World War I Coast Guardsmen

Business
Sept. 6 (UPI) -- Two members of the U.S. Coast Guard, who died in the sinking of their ship during World War I, posthumously received Purple Heart medals this week. Vice Adm. Linda Fagan, U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area Commander, posthumously presented the honors at a ceremony at Base Alameda, Calif., to the descendants of ships oiler Edward Kelleher of Perry, Okla., and acting quartermaster Arthur Deasy of Brooklyn, N.Y. The men died in the sinking of the Coast Guard Cutter Tampa on Sept. 26, 1918. Bob Kelleher accepted the medal on behalf of his uncle, and Lisa Rehman received the medal on behalf of Deasy, her great-uncle. The ship was one of six Coast Guard cutters assigned to the U.S. Navy, and escorted over 350 merchant ships across the Atlantic Ocean to Allied ports during the war. ...
Four-in-one pill prevents third of heart problems

Four-in-one pill prevents third of heart problems

Health
A daily pill containing four medicines can cut the number of heart attacks and strokes by a third, a study shows. The polypill contains blood-thinning aspirin, a cholesterol-lowering statin and two drugs to lower blood pressure. The researchers - in Iran and the UK - said the pill had a huge impact but cost just pennies a day.They suggest giving it to everyone over a certain age in poorer countries, where doctors have fewer options and are less able to assess individuals.Coronary heart disease and stroke are the top two causes of death worldwide, killing more than 15 million people a year. Smoking, obesity and doing little exercise all increase the risk of an unhealthy heart. The study, published in the Lancet, was based in more than 100 villages in Iran...
AI may help to spot heart problems

AI may help to spot heart problems

Health
A new way of identifying a common condition that causes the heart to beat irregularly may have been discovered by artificial intelligence.Atrial fibrillation affects one million people in the UK and increases the risk of stroke and long-term heart problems.It is relatively simple to diagnose when the heart is beating irregularly, but not when it returns to normal.Computer modelling at the Mayo Clinic in the US may have identified signs that indicate previous abnormalities.Researchers said it was still early days, but believe the system could lead to earlier and easier detection of the problem and, therefore, ensure patients get the right treatment, saving lives. The findings are published in The Lancet.Atrial fibrillation symptoms ...
Psoriasis therapy may treat coronary inflammation that leads to heart attack

Psoriasis therapy may treat coronary inflammation that leads to heart attack

Health
July 31 (UPI) -- Anti-inflammatory biologic medications that treat psoriasis may also help to reduce coronary inflammation, and prevent heart attacks in the long run, a new study says. These therapies could also help people with lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases that elevate the risk of heart attacks and stroke, according to research published Wednesday in JAMA Cardiology. The researchers made the finding using a novel imaging biomarker -- the perivascular fat attenuation index. It detected coronary artery inflammation, which decreases fat tissue, called known as perivascular fat, around arteries. "Coronary inflammation offers important clues about the risk of developing heart artery disease," Nehal N. Mehta, a researcher at National Heart, Lung, and Blo...