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Tag: heart

Heart transplant survivor runs half-marathon with her team of doctors

Heart transplant survivor runs half-marathon with her team of doctors

Health
Kristin Marx finished the Milwaukee Half-Marathon Sunday, surrounded by family, friends and her cardiac-care team. It was a huge accomplishment for Marx, 37, who said she'd come up with the "crazy idea" with her sister-in-law one day in July. "We thought, 'Hey, wouldn't it be fun to do a half-marathon.' It was kind of in a joking way and I wasn't sure if I wanted to commit to it because I have never run a half-marathon in my life," Marx said. It was also a huge deal because more than 16 years ago, Marx had been diagnosed with cardiomyopathy and was in and out of the hospital in Wisconsin, desperately awaiting a heart transplant. Man overcomes paralysis to run half-marathon with his surgeon and the driver who hit him In 2000, Marx was a healthy, 20-year-old college sophomore at the Univ...
Researchers uncover new genes linked to congenital heart disease

Researchers uncover new genes linked to congenital heart disease

Health
Oct. 9 (UPI) -- Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital have discovered new genes associated with congenital heart disease in babies.The study, published today in Nature Genetics, identified several genetic mutations linked to congenital heart disease, or CHD.CHD is the leading cause of death from birth defects with one in every 100 babies born having CHD. Surgical advancements and care have improved the outcomes of babies born with CHD, although patients still are at elevated risk for heart complications later in life, other congenital abnormalities and neurodevelopmental deficits.Research from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium, and the Bench to Bassinet Program has uncovered genetic mutations that may be part of the underlying cause o...
Will an e-cigarette harm your heart?

Will an e-cigarette harm your heart?

Health
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 -- The nicotine in e-cigarette vapor may cause adrenaline levels to spike in the heart, potentially increasing risk of heart attack and sudden cardiac death, a new study reports.Electronic cigarettes have been promoted as a healthier alternative to tobacco cigarettes because they deliver vastly lower levels of carcinogens, researchers say.But laboratory studies show that e-cigarettes still could pose a threat to health because of the nicotine that the devices typically deliver, said lead researcher Dr. Holly Middlekauff. She's a cardiologist with the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles.Nicotine-containing e-cigarettes appear to promote a fight-or-flight response by the sympathetic nervous system, causing a release of adrena...
Study: Viagra may harm, not help, patients with heart valve disorder

Study: Viagra may harm, not help, patients with heart valve disorder

Health
TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 -- When one of the heart's valves goes awry, this can lead to dangerously high blood pressure in the nearby lungs.Recent studies have suggested that the impotence drug Viagra (sildenafil) might help ease the problem, known as "pulmonary hypertension linked to valvular heart disease."But new research suggests the medicine might do the opposite -- raising patients' heart risks instead.In what he called a "surprise" finding, "six-month treatment with sildenafil leads to worse clinical outcomes than placebo," said lead researcher Dr. Javier Bermejo, a cardiologist at University Gregorio Maranon General Hospital in Madrid, Spain.The bottom line, he said: "Long-term usage of sildenafil for treating residual pulmonary hypertension in patients with valvular heart disease sho...
A first: Drug lowers heart risks by curbing inflammation

A first: Drug lowers heart risks by curbing inflammation

Health
For the first time, a drug has helped prevent heart attacks by curbing inflammation, a new and very different approach than lowering cholesterol, the focus for many years. People on the drug also had surprisingly lower cancer death rates, especially from lung cancer. An anti-tumor effect is an exciting possibility, but it needs much more study because the heart experiment wasn't intended to test that. Doctors say the results on the drug, canakinumab (can-uh-KIN-yoo-mab), open a new frontier. Many heart attacks occur in people whose cholesterol is normal and whose main risk is chronic inflammation that can lead to clogged arteries. "We suddenly know we can address the inflammation itself, the same way we learned almost 25 years ago that we could address cholesterol. It's very exciting," sa...