News That Matters

Tag: help

New 'zombie' gene found in elephants could help humans fight cancer

New 'zombie' gene found in elephants could help humans fight cancer

Health
They may not be the fastest or the smartest or even the scariest, but when it comes to beating cancer, elephants are the superheroes of the living world. It's a phenomenon that has baffled scientists since the 1970s. After all, at their size, they should have a much higher rate of the disease. The larger a living thing, the more the cells, and the more the cells, the more chance one of them turns out to be cancerous -- which is why tall people are more vulnerable to the disease than short people and why Marmaduke is much more likely to get cancer than the Taco Bell Chihuahua. And yet, cancer rates among elephants is less than 5 percent, comparable to the rates in much smaller animals. The lifetime cancer mortality rate for humans is about 20 percent. So what gives? With all those cells...
DNA mutations 'hotspots' may help determine cancer risk, study says

DNA mutations 'hotspots' may help determine cancer risk, study says

Health
July 30 (UPI) -- Researchers have identified mutation "hotspots" in DNA where genetic mutations are significantly raised, leading to potentially better cancer risk determination. These mutations, defined as "typos" by researchers at Indiana University in Bloomington, occur when DNA replicates during cellular division. Their findings were published in two papers, one on replication errors and the other on substitution patterns, in the August issue of the journal Genetics. "This research gets us closer to understanding how the cell's replication machinery interacts with DNA," Dr. Patricia Foster, a professor emerita in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Biology, said in a press release. "If you can understand exactly why an error occurs at a particular point on t...
Parents desperate to help children they believe have rare, controversial disorder

Parents desperate to help children they believe have rare, controversial disorder

Health
Vanessa Baier's 4-year-old daughter Alexia was in full-on crisis. "I just kept thinking, 'What's going on with my child?'" Vanessa Baier told "20/20" while fighting back tears. Alexia had been breaking out into erratic, explosive behavior that would appear completely out of left field. "It was just swings that were very dramatic and uncalled for, for the situation," her father, Brian Baier, told "20/20." "There have been times where [her tantrum] was an hour and a half, two hours," Vanessa Baier said. Alexia, now 8, wasn't always so volatile. Her mother, a special-needs teacher; her father, an accountant; and their oldest daughter, Kyla, had all welcomed a very typical baby girl to their loving home outside Chicago. "She had such a fun personality. She was always laughing, smiling...

Your stress about money can help you manage it

Finance
You should read your anxiety about money as a call to action, says certified financial planner Douglas Boneparth. "Money tends to be an emotional area of people's lives, so it's no surprise that they think about this quite frequently," said Boneparth, president of Bone Fide Wealth. "There are a number of ways to deal with this." Start with information, he said. That can come from a certified financial planner, if you can afford one, or from doing your own personal finance research. "Educatio...
Understanding snorts can help horse caretakers improve animal welfare

Understanding snorts can help horse caretakers improve animal welfare

Science
July 11 (UPI) -- Horses snort more when they're comfortable and happy. The communication could help caretakers achieve more positive animal welfare outcomes. Proper care for animals involves minimizing stress. But how do caretakers know when animals are happy or bothered? Interpreting the emotions of horses can be especially difficult. Many behavioral signals displayed by horses are ambiguous, and studies of physiological signals have yielded contradictory results. Many horse owners and caretakers have noted an association between snorting and positive environments, but the connection hadn't been scientifically tested until now. Researchers in France monitored snorting frequency among 48 horses. Half were riding horses, kept in confined environs and separated in solitary stalls. The othe...