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Here's what you need to know if you have inflation jitters

Here's what you need to know if you have inflation jitters

Finance
Seemingly everyone is on edge about the Federal Reserve's next moves — with reason.Throughout the nearly nine-year bull market run, the Fed held rates near zero. But recent signs of rising inflation could push the central bank into hiking rates more aggressively, which will have far-reaching consequences for consumers."Inflation is accelerating and may well push interest rates higher, allowing the Fed to move policy rates three times this year, and perhaps even four," Rick Rieder, chief investment officer of global fixed income at BlackRock, said in a statement.For the average American, the threat of rising interest rates isn't necessarily bad. It's generally considered a sign that the economy is doing well, which is what helped jump-start a wave of bonuses and may lead to more pay increas
Aadhaar faces biggest test tomorrow, here's what you should know

Aadhaar faces biggest test tomorrow, here's what you should know

Finance
NEW DELHI: Five years after the first petition was filed challenging the validity of Aadhaar, a Supreme Court bench headed by Chief Justice of India Dipak Misra will begin hearing the petitions against Aadhaar tomorrow. In August, a nine-judge Constitution Bench headed by then Chief Justice of India JS Khehar had ruled that privacy was a fundamental right guaranteed under the Constitution. Now the government has to convince the Supreme Court that forcing citizens to give a sample of their fingerprints and their iris scan does not violate privacy. The government can only place reasonable restrictions on limited grounds such as national sovereignty and security, public order, decency, etc, as specified in Article 19 (2) of the Constitution. The petitioners are challenging the nature ...
Men and women have different financial regrets. Here's how to slay them

Men and women have different financial regrets. Here's how to slay them

Finance
How to save $ 1,000 this yearMen and women aren't too far apart on their financial expectations, but their biggest financial regrets diverge. Men's biggest money regret is not investing, while women's biggest financial regret is not saving, according to a study from Go Banking Rates. The survey found that nearly 15% of men said not investingwas their top financial regret compared to about 9% of women. Men are also more likely than women to have a fear of losing money in the stock market. Men also have a stronger regret of falling into debt and even putting money toward college. Women's top regret, according to the study, was not saving enough. And for good reason: a higher percentage of women than men have less than $ 1,000 in a savings account and 36% of women (versus 33% of men) have ...
Here's What Can Happen to Your Body When You Cut Out Alcohol

Here's What Can Happen to Your Body When You Cut Out Alcohol

Health
This is all the motivation you need for Dry January. The latest New Year’s trend has nothing to do with alcohol—literally. For millions of people, January 1 marks the first day of not just a new year, but a “dry” January, or month-long break with booze. Started by the UK's Alcohol Concern organization in 2013, the movement’s main goal is to help people "reset their relationship with alcohol." But what happens to your body when you become a temporary teetotaler?“Nothing bad,” says Jamile Wakim-Fleming, MD, a hepatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “[Abstaining temporarily] is only going to be beneficial.” (One caveat: heavy drinkers should only quit with medical assistance, since they can experience a life-threatening form of withdrawal.)Thi
The SEC busted an alleged $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme. Here's how not to be victimized.

The SEC busted an alleged $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme. Here's how not to be victimized.

Finance
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday announced charges against a group of unregistered funds and their owner, for allegedly fleecing retail investors through a $ 1.2 billion Ponzi scheme. The victims include more than 8,400 individuals, many of whom are elderly.In a Ponzi scheme, the perpetrator generally takes money from one set of investors to pay off others, often earlier investors or simply diverts the proceeds for private gain.Fraud complaints have increased by 60 percent in the last five years, according to the Federal Trade Commission. "The frightening truth about fraud is scammers scam and liars lie," said Gerri Walsh, senior vice president of investor education at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, or FINRA, which regulates brokerage firms.To lessen the cha...