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If you hit the $502 million Mega Millions jackpot, here's how to keep it quiet

If you hit the $502 million Mega Millions jackpot, here's how to keep it quiet

Finance
With the Mega Millions jackpot swelling to at least $ 502 million for Friday night's drawing, many ticket holders likely are daydreaming about what they'd do with that kind of money.They also should be thinking about how they would protect their identity if they win big.Experts say it's the most important step to take to protect your sudden wealth. It also isn't always an easy thing to do.While some states allow winners to easily remain anonymous when they collect their winnings, others do not. In some places, you can create a trust to receive the money to avoid your name being attached to the cash, as long as you plan ahead.Whether you can shield your identity or not, you should assemble a team of professionals who are experienced in helping lottery winners. That includes an attorney — th
Dehydration Caused Tim McGraw to Collapse On Stage. Here's Why the Condition Is So Scary

Dehydration Caused Tim McGraw to Collapse On Stage. Here's Why the Condition Is So Scary

Health
Country singer Tim McGraw collapsed on stage in Dublin over the weekend, People reported this morning, and dehydration appears to be to blame. McGraw’s wife, Faith Hill, told concert-goers that her 50-year-old husband was “super dehydrated,” and that she “made the decision that he cannot come back out on stage.”McGraw’s rep said in a statement that the singer was “attended to by local medical staff on-site and will be fine.” That’s certainly a relief, but it made us wonder: How serious does dehydration have to get to cause someone to drop to his knees while performing, as McGraw reportedly did? And how exactly does a lack of fluids lead to a full-on collapse?It turns out, several different factors can be at play. The body needs water for optimal functioning of course, and lots of inne
Inspired by Lindsey Vonn? Here's how to score spring ski deals

Inspired by Lindsey Vonn? Here's how to score spring ski deals

Finance
The first day of spring is just a few weeks away. But if the Winter Olympics have inspired you to squeeze in a skiing or snowboarding trip, you still have plenty of time to score a bargain."It depends on how you define 'spring,'" said Dan Sherman, chief marketing officer for Ski.com, which customizes snowsports travel packages.Spring skiers have already dodged two of the priciest periods of the season — the December holidays, and Presidents Day weekend in February, Sherman said. They've also missed what the site says was the best week for costs, crowds and powder, from late January into early February.Vacationers on "spring break" in March represent a third ski-season peak in prices and traffic. (Amid a slew of warm-weather destinations, Denver ranks eighth on airfare-tracking tool Hopper'
Here's what you need to know if you have inflation jitters

Here's what you need to know if you have inflation jitters

Finance
Seemingly everyone is on edge about the Federal Reserve's next moves — with reason.Throughout the nearly nine-year bull market run, the Fed held rates near zero. But recent signs of rising inflation could push the central bank into hiking rates more aggressively, which will have far-reaching consequences for consumers."Inflation is accelerating and may well push interest rates higher, allowing the Fed to move policy rates three times this year, and perhaps even four," Rick Rieder, chief investment officer of global fixed income at BlackRock, said in a statement.For the average American, the threat of rising interest rates isn't necessarily bad. It's generally considered a sign that the economy is doing well, which is what helped jump-start a wave of bonuses and may lead to more pay increas
Aadhaar faces biggest test tomorrow, here's what you should know

Aadhaar faces biggest test tomorrow, here's what you should know

Finance
NEW DELHI: Five years after the first petition was filed challenging the validity of Aadhaar, a Supreme Court bench headed by Chief Justice of India Dipak Misra will begin hearing the petitions against Aadhaar tomorrow. In August, a nine-judge Constitution Bench headed by then Chief Justice of India JS Khehar had ruled that privacy was a fundamental right guaranteed under the Constitution. Now the government has to convince the Supreme Court that forcing citizens to give a sample of their fingerprints and their iris scan does not violate privacy. The government can only place reasonable restrictions on limited grounds such as national sovereignty and security, public order, decency, etc, as specified in Article 19 (2) of the Constitution. The petitioners are challenging the nature ...