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What Is High-Protein Bread—and Should You Try It?

What Is High-Protein Bread—and Should You Try It?

Health
You may have seen pics of high-protein bread (or bagels, waffles, or tortillas) popping up on Instagram lately. High-protein baked goods are really taking off, as the popularity of protein-packed everything (from snack chips to coffee creamer!) reaches a fever pitch. But what is high-protein bread exactly—and should you be adding it to your shopping cart? Here are a few things to know before you try a loaf.Different brands use different sources of proteinSome high-protein breads include the same ingredients typically found in protein powders—such as isolated whey protein, pea protein, soy protein, or egg white protein. Other brands use wheat protein, or vital wheat gluten; while others use ground nuts or pulses, such as almond flour&nb
17 High-Protein Snacks You Can Eat On the Go

17 High-Protein Snacks You Can Eat On the Go

Health
Protein: 7 grams per quarter-cup servingFor only 120 calories per serving, these beans offer 5 grams each of protein and fiber. Better yet, a daily serving of dietary pulses like chickpeas (as well as beans, lentils, and peas) can lower LDL cholesterol levels, according to research in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Make your own by mixing rinsed and drained chickpeas in a bowl with olive oil and your choice of spices (we love chili powder, cumin, salt, and pepper) and then baking them in an oven preheated to 425 degrees for about 45 minutes.Let's block ads! (Why?) Nutrition - Health.com
Study: Regular soda causes body to store more fat after high-protein meals

Study: Regular soda causes body to store more fat after high-protein meals

Health
FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 -- Combining a sugary soda with your burger or fried chicken can really prime your body to pack on more pounds, a new study suggests.Folks who had a sweetened drink with a high-protein meal stored more unused fat, compared to others who ate the same food with a sugar-free beverage, laboratory tests revealed.Their bodies did not burn about a third of the additional calories provided by the sugary drink, researchers found.The participants also burned less fat from their food, and it took less energy overall to digest the meal."If we are adding extra carbohydrates on top of what's already in a meal, that will definitely have an effect on the body being able to use fat as an energy source, and it will more than likely go into energy storage," said lead researcher Shanon C...