News That Matters

Tag: hotter

Warming toll: 1 degree hotter, trillions of tons of ice gone

Warming toll: 1 degree hotter, trillions of tons of ice gone

Technology
The world has gotten hotter, lost trillions of tons of ice and suffered more weather disasters since climate negotiations startedBy BY SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science WriterDecember 1, 2019, 10:05 AM3 min read Since leaders first started talking about tackling the problem of climate change, the world has spewed more heat-trapping gases, gotten hotter and suffered hundreds of extreme weather disasters. Fires have burned, ice has melted and seas have grown. The first United Nations diplomatic conference to tackle climate change was in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. Here’s what’s happened to Earth since: — The carbon dioxide level in the air has jumped from about 358 parts per million to nearly 412, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. That’s a 15% rise in 27 yea
Climate change: Heatwave made up to 3C hotter by warming

Climate change: Heatwave made up to 3C hotter by warming

Science
The searing July heatwave that hit Europe last week was made both more likely and more intense by human-induced climate change, scientists say.A rapid attribution study says that heating added up to 3C to the intensity of the event that scorched the UK, France and the Netherlands. In France, the heatwave was made at least 10 times and up to 100 times more likely by human activities.The shorter event in the UK was made at least twice as likely, experts say.The World Weather Attribution Group has carried out a number of similar studies in recent years to work out the impact of climate change on extreme events. This new report looks at the July heatwave that saw temperatures soar above 40C in many countries including Belgium, France and the Netherlands. In ...

Hotter than Page 3! Rhian Sugden strips to bra for festive flash

Entertainment
It may be cold outside, but the Page 3 babe sent fans into meltdown as she stripped down to her bra for an Instagram snap.Rhian Sugden, 32, looked sizzling hot in a plunging lacy black bra, which flaunted her curves.She teamed this with a simple silver necklace as she gave a sultry look to the camera.The blonde was also rocking a seriously glossy pout, while her fringed locks were styled poker straight. “Up and at ‘em”Rhian SugdenShe captioned the post, which racked up more than 6,000 likes, "Up and at ‘em."One fan exclaimed: "Wow, unreal," while another added: "Exquisite beauty."A third chimed in: "Absolutely stunning, love seeing your posts."The star was much more wrapped up days earlier as she prepared for Christmas.Rhian posed with new husband Oliver Mellor in m...
Weather: UK experiencing hotter days and 'tropical nights' – Met Office

Weather: UK experiencing hotter days and 'tropical nights' – Met Office

Science
The UK has experienced more weather extremes over the last 10 years when compared with previous decades, a Met Office report has said. The hottest days have become almost 1C hotter, warm spells have increased, while the coldest days are not as cold. The number of so-called tropical nights - when temperatures stay above 20C - is increasing. The Met Office says these changes are consistent with warming driven by human activities. The new study compares UK weather data from the period 1961-1990 with the 10 years between 2008 and 2017. Media playback is unsupported on your device 2018 joint hottest summer for UK 2018 and 1976 - a tale of two heatwaves The study finds that on average the...
The last decade was hotter than the previous 11,000 years, study shows

The last decade was hotter than the previous 11,000 years, study shows

Science
Jan. 31 (UPI) -- A new survey of temperature variability in North America and Europe during the Holocene Epoch suggests the string of record-setting temperatures over the last decade is truly an exception. During the last 11,000 years, it's never been this hot for this many years in a row."I would say it is significant that temperatures of the most recent decade exceed the warmest temperatures of our reconstruction by 0.5 degrees Fahrenheit, having few -- if any -- precedents over the last 11,000 years," Jeremiah Marsicek, who recently earned his doctoral graduate in geology and geophysics at the University of Wyoming, said in a news release. "Additionally, we learned that the climate fluctuates naturally over the last 11,000 years and would have led to cooling today in the absence of huma...