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Archaeologists uncover dynamic human prehistory across the Arabian Peninsula

Archaeologists uncover dynamic human prehistory across the Arabian Peninsula

Science
Sept. 1 (UPI) -- Until now, relatively little was known about early human history on the Arabian Peninsula's vast interior. It turns out, the region was quite a dynamic place. An extensive archaeological survey of the peninsula's interior has turned up the earliest evidence that human habitation in the region dated to 400,000 years ago. The collaborative effort between researchers in Germany and Saudi Arabia -- detailed Wednesday in the journal Nature -- suggests humans moved across the peninsula in waves, each influx bringing a new phase of material culture to the interior. Both archaeological and paleoclimate data suggest the typically arid peninsula experienced periods of increased rainfall, making the region slightly more hospitable for humans moving through the region. I...
Wildlife biodiversity is a boon to human health, seafood nutrition

Wildlife biodiversity is a boon to human health, seafood nutrition

Science
April 5 (UPI) -- Biodiversity provides human health benefits on the land and in the water, according to a pair of newly published studies. Previous studies have highlighted many of the ways biodiversity offers indirect benefits to human health -- by encouraging pollination, for example. But new research suggests biodiversity also provides direct health benefits by keeping humans from getting sick. Advertisement According to one new study, published Monday in the journal PNAS, biodiversity helps minimize the risk of zoonotic disease outbreaks. "There's a persistent myth that wild areas with high levels of biodiversity are hotspots for disease," lead study author Felicia Keesing said in a press release. "More animal diversity must equal more dangerous pathogens. But this turns out to be wr...
‘A wonderful human’: The Goldbergs actor George Segal dies aged 87

‘A wonderful human’: The Goldbergs actor George Segal dies aged 87

Entertainment
Actor George Segal, best known for starring in US sitcom The Goldbergs, has died at the age of 87.Segal, who was Oscar-nominated for 1966 black comedy-drama Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, died on Tuesday in Santa Rosa, California. His wife Sonia Segal said: "The family is devastated to announce that this morning George Segal passed away due to complications from bypass surgery."The actor has played Albert 'Pops' Solomon on TV comedy The Goldbergs since 2013.Also an accomplished banjo player, he starred as magazine publisher Jack Gallo in the US sitcom Just Shoot Me from 1997 to 2003. ...
UK sanctions four Chinese officials over Uighur human rights abuses

UK sanctions four Chinese officials over Uighur human rights abuses

World
Four Chinese officials will be sanctioned by the UK over "appalling violations" of human rights against Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang province, the foreign secretary has announced.Sanctions have also been placed on an official body - Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps Public Security Bureau. The US, Canada and the European Union have also introduced sanctions, with the UK imposing travel bans and asset freezes. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player Chinese official defends Uighur 'training' camps Dominic Raab sai...
Climate change, human activity threatens carbon uptake in recovering Amazon forests

Climate change, human activity threatens carbon uptake in recovering Amazon forests

Science
March 19 (UPI) -- Efforts to restore cleared forests in the Amazon are sometimes undermined by climate change and human activity, according to a new study. The research, published Friday in the journal Nature Communications, showed forest plots that have been frequently or recently disturbed by fire and human activity are slower to regenerate, stunting carbon uptake. Advertisement To curb climate change, many countries have promised to restore areas of forest previously cleared for logging or agriculture. Secondary forest growth can absorb a lot more carbon than old growth forests, but not all secondary forest regeneration is created equal. To better understand the factors that influence carbon uptake in recovering forests, scientists in Brazil and Britain used satellites to track change...