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Tag: Humans

Humans stored bone marrow for delayed consumption 400,000 years ago

Humans stored bone marrow for delayed consumption 400,000 years ago

Science
Oct. 11 (UPI) -- Paleolithic humans stored animal bones for as long as two months before eating the marrow. The discovery -- published this week in the journal Scientific Advances -- suggests early humans were practicing food storage and delayed consumption as early as 400,000 years ago. The evidence was recovered in Qesem Cave, a Lower Paleolithic archeological site located outside of Tel Aviv, Israel. "Bone marrow constitutes a significant source of nutrition and as such was long featured in the prehistoric diet," Ran Barkai, a professor of archaeology at Tel Aviv University, said in a news release. "Until now, evidence has pointed to immediate consumption of marrow following the procurement and removal of soft tissues. In our paper, we present evidence of storage and delayed consumpti...
Humans were altering the planet as early as 2000 B.C.

Humans were altering the planet as early as 2000 B.C.

Science
Aug. 30 (UPI) -- According to a new study, the Anthropocene began some 4,000 years earlier than previously thought. Archaeological data suggests humans were responsible for significant land-cover changes as early as 2000 B.C. The Anthropocene is the current geological age. It is described as the period in which human activity has been the dominant influence on Earth's climate and the environment. Some scientists contend the Anthropocene began during the late 19th or early 20th century, as the industrial revolution transformed the global economy. Others have argued the epoch began when nuclear weapons testing began altering the atmosphere. But the latest research contends the geological age began much earlier. "The activities of farmers, pastoralists and hunter-gatherers had significantly...
Extinction: Humans played big role in demise of the cave bear

Extinction: Humans played big role in demise of the cave bear

Science
The arrival of human ancestors in Europe some 40,000 years ago coincided with the downfall of the cave bear, scientists have revealed.New evidence suggests humans hunted the bear and drove it from caves, putting it on the road to extinction.The fate of the species was sealed by other pressures, such as the onset of the last Ice Age, and shrinking food resources.The bear eventually died out 24,000 years ago."We see this dramatic drop in the population of the cave bear starting from 40,000 years ago, which coincides with the arrival of anatomically modern humans in Europe," said Prof Verena Schuenemann of the University of Zurich, who led the study."It is the clearest evidence we have so far that humans might have played a big role...
Early humans may have crossed Central Asian deserts during wetter conditions

Early humans may have crossed Central Asian deserts during wetter conditions

Science
May 30 (UPI) -- New research suggests northern and central Asia may have hosted early human migrations between 50,000 and 30,000 years ago. During the Late Pleistocene, early humans began spreading out across Eurasia. Previously, archaeologists and paleoanthropologists assumed pathways across northern and central Asia were blocked by mountains and deserts. As a result, most research efforts have focused on a southern migration route along the Indian Ocean. New research, however, suggests climate variation made northern and central Asia accessible to humans for brief periods of times. "Archaeological discussions of the migration routes of Pleistocene Homo sapiens have often focused on a 'coastal' route from Africa to Australia, skirting around India and Southeast Asia," Michael Petraglia,...
Smart speaker recordings reviewed by humans

Smart speaker recordings reviewed by humans

Technology
Amazon, Apple and Google all employ staff who listen to customer voice recordings from their smart speakers and voice assistant apps.News site Bloomberg highlighted the topic after speaking to Amazon staff who "reviewed" Alexa recordings.All three companies say voice recordings are occasionally reviewed to improve speech recognition. But the reaction to the Bloomberg article suggests many customers are unaware that humans may be listening.The news site said it had spoken to seven people who reviewed audio from Amazon Echo smart speakers and the Alexa service.Reviewers typically transcribed and annotated voice clips to help improve Amazon's speech recognition systems.Amazon's voice recordings are associated with an account number, the customer's first name...