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Tag: hurt

S.C. congressional candidate Katie Arrington seriously hurt in car crash

S.C. congressional candidate Katie Arrington seriously hurt in car crash

Health
June 23 (UPI) -- Katie Arrington, a Republican candidate in a South Carolina congressional district, was in serious condition after a car crash late Friday. Arrington, who defeated incumbent Mark Sanford in the primary on June 12, underwent surgery after sustaining a fracture in her back and several broken bones, according to a Vote Katie Arrington Facebook post. A part of her small intestine was removed and the main artery in her legs will require a stent because of a partial collapse. Arrington will remain in the hospital for at least two weeks, the posting said. "As we all know, Katie Arrington is an extremely strong woman and has tremendous faith and an incredibly supportive family," the message said. "And it is from her strong faith, the support of her family, the prayers and suppor...
Why that summer job won't hurt your financial aid

Why that summer job won't hurt your financial aid

Finance
It's a pretty common question heard from college students who work during school or over the summer: "Will my income affect my eligibility for scholarships or aid?" For most students, the answer is no. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, the form that colleges and universities use to determine a student's need for financial aid, has protections in place for student earnings. For the 2018-19 school year, the amount a student can earn before it is counted as income is $ 6,570. To make more than that, a studen...
Minority health hurt by lack of participation in clinical trials, researchers say

Minority health hurt by lack of participation in clinical trials, researchers say

Health
June 15 (UPI) -- Before pharmaceutical companies can put drugs on the market, the Food and Drug Administration requires years of stringent clinical research to see if they will be effective and safe in the general population. But one thing often is lacking in those trials -- participants from minority groups. With different genetic makeup, members of minority groups -- including African-Americans and Hispanics -- may react to drugs differently or need other types of treatment because of a greater risk for certain diseases and conditions. The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities reports that about 10 percent of the minority population participates in clinical studies. Researchers at the University of California, Davis found that, in cancer clinical trials, Hispanic...
New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

Technology
The nation's newest weather satellite, launched less than three months ago, has a serious cooling problem that could affect the quality of its pictures. The trouble is with the GOES-17 satellite's premier instrument for taking images of hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions and other natural calamities, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday. The imager's infrared sensors aren't getting properly cooled. Experts are scrambling to understand what went wrong and how to fix it. Officials expect it will take at least a few months to figure out. "As you can imagine, doing this remotely from 22,000 miles below only looking at the on-orbit data is a challenge," said Steve Volz, head of NOAA's satellite and information service. NOAA stresses that three other GOES s...
Loneliness does more than pull on your heart strings — it may hurt your heart

Loneliness does more than pull on your heart strings — it may hurt your heart

Health
Silent, uncomfortable, forlorn, withdrawn -- these are all feelings likely felt by the lonely. Research shows that these feelings don’t just cause emotional stress, they are part of a real association between social isolation and negative health outcomes. For the first time, studies are looking at heart failure in lonely people. Over 6 million people live with heart failure in the United States, with over 960,000 new cases diagnosed each year. By 2030, there may be more than 8 million cases of heart failure. “One in five Americans over the age of 40 are affected by heart failure,” Dr. Clyde Yancy, American Heart Association (AHA) spokesperson and chief of the cardiology division at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, told ABC News. It’s a con...