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Tag: immune

Gut cells alert immune system to invading parasites

Gut cells alert immune system to invading parasites

Science
Dec. 30 (UPI) -- Cells in the gut are the first to sound the alarm when parasites invade the body, according to a study published this week in the journal PNAS. When scientists exposed mouse models to the parasite Cryptosporidium, they found the first warning signal was emitted by epithelial cells lining the intestines, not an immune cell. Advertisement The gut's epithelial cells, called enterocytes, are mostly responsible for absorbing nutrients. But as the latest experiments revealed, they perform surveillance duties, using the molecular receptor NLRP6 to warn other cells of an invading pathogen. NLRP6 is a component of a multi-protein complex known as the inflammasome. "You can think about the inflammasome as an alarm system in a house," senior study author Boris Striepen said in a ne...
Oxford vaccine produces strong immune response in older adults, early results show

Oxford vaccine produces strong immune response in older adults, early results show

Technology
The COVID-19 vaccine developed by Oxford University produces a strong immune response in older adults, data from early trials has shown.The phase one and phase two results suggest that one of the groups most at risk of death or serious illness from COVID-19 may be able to build immunity, according to data published in The Lancet medical journal. It comes a day after Pfizer announced its coronavirus vaccine was 94% effective among adults over 65 in its final efficacy results, and that it would be seeking authorisation over the next few days.Live coronavirus updates from the UK and around the world Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player ...
Oxford University coronavirus vaccine triggers ‘immune response’ in trials

Oxford University coronavirus vaccine triggers ‘immune response’ in trials

Technology
A coronavirus vaccine being developed at the University of Oxford is safe and induces an immune response to the disease, the first phase of human trials has revealed.Doses of the vaccine, called AZD1222, were given to 1,077 healthy adults aged between 18 and 55 in five UK hospitals in April and May. The results - published in the Lancet journal on Monday - show they induced strong antibody and T-cell immune responses for up to 56 days after they were given. ...
COVID-19 candidate vaccine induces strong immune response; late-stage trial to start July 23

COVID-19 candidate vaccine induces strong immune response; late-stage trial to start July 23

Health
July 15 (UPI) -- U.S. biotech company Moderna said a vaccine it is developing has shown to induce a "rapid and strong" immune response against COVID-19, stating it will begin late-stage testing in less than two weeks. In a press release, the company said analysis of trial results for its potential COVID-19 vaccine "mRNA-1273" reaffirmed the "positive interim data assessment" it announced mid-May when the drug first showed a "potential to prevent" the deadly and infectious coronavirus. Advertisement During the trial, 45 healthy adult volunteers under 55 years of age were given two doses of the vaccine separated by 28 days with all participates who received doses of the drug in 100 micrograms or less reporting only mild, transient reactions such as fatigue, chills and headaches. The finding...
Coronavirus: Immune clue sparks treatment hope

Coronavirus: Immune clue sparks treatment hope

Health
UK scientists are to begin testing a treatment that it is hoped could counter the effects of Covid-19 in the most seriously ill patients.It has been found those with the most severe form of the disease have extremely low numbers of an immune cell called a T-cell. T-cells clear infection from the body.The clinical trial will evaluate if a drug called interleukin 7, known to boost T-cell numbers, can aid patients' recovery.It involves scientists from the Francis Crick Institute, King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital.They have looked at immune cells in the blood of 60 Covid-19 patients and found an apparent crash in the numbers of T-cells. Prof Adrian Hayday from the Crick Institute said it was a "great surprise" to see what was happening w...