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Tag: impact

Rat remains reveal 2,000 years of human impact on Pacific island ecosystems

Rat remains reveal 2,000 years of human impact on Pacific island ecosystems

Science
June 5 (UPI) -- New analysis of ancient rat remains have helped scientists trace the impacts of humans on Pacific island ecosystems as far back as 2,000 years ago. Many scientists argue the Earth has entered a new geological epoch called the Anthropocene, an era defined by humans' growing impact on the planet's ecosystems. While some believe the era began between 50 and 300 years ago, a growing body of research suggests humans began altering the planet's geology, biodiversity and climate several thousands of years ago. Several studies, for example, have shown early human populations in South America left a definite ecological signature on the parts of the Amazon. But measuring the ecological impacts of early humans isn't easy. As part of the latest study, scientists looked to rat remains...
'Shocking' human impact reported on world's protected areas

'Shocking' human impact reported on world's protected areas

Science
One third of the world's protected lands are being degraded by human activities and are not fit for purpose, according to a new study.Six million sq km of forests, parks and conservation areas are under "intense human pressure" from mining, logging and farming.Countries rich and poor, are quick to designate protected areas but fail to follow up with funding and enforcement. This is why biodiversity in still in catastrophic decline, the authors say. Global efforts to care for our natural heritage by creating protected zones have, in general, been a huge conservation success story. Since the Convention on Biological Diversity was ratified in 1992, the areas under protect...
Tourism's carbon impact three times larger than estimated

Tourism's carbon impact three times larger than estimated

Science
A new study says global tourism accounts for 8% of carbon emissions, around three times greater than previous estimates. The new assessment is bigger because it includes emissions from travel, plus the full life-cycle of carbon in tourists' food, hotels and shopping.Driving the increase are visitors from affluent countries who travel to other wealthy destinations. The US tops the rankings followed by China, Germany and India. Tourism is a huge and booming global industry worth over $ 7 trillion, and employs one in ten workers around the world. It's growing at around 4% per annum.Previous estimates of the impact of all this travel on carbon suggested that tourism accounted for 2.5-3% of emissions. However in what is claimed to be the most comprehensive assessment to date, this new study exa...
Martian moons Phobos and Deimos carved out by violent impact

Martian moons Phobos and Deimos carved out by violent impact

Science
April 18 (UPI) -- The Martian moons Phobos and Deimos were formed after a large object struck the Red Planet a few billion years ago, according to a new model developed by scientists at the Southwest Research Institute.Scientists have considered a number of origin scenarios for Phobos and Deimos, including the possibility that the satellites are asteroids captured by Mars' gravity.The most promising formation theory is one involving an impact and an equatorial disk of debris. The two small moons formed from the disk of rocky fragments. But until now, attempts to model such a scenario have failed to convince."Ours is the first self-consistent model to identify the type of impact needed to lead to the formation of Mars' two small moons," Robin Canup, an associate vice president in the SwRI S...
Powell: 'Tariffs can push up prices' but 'too early to say' what impact will be

Powell: 'Tariffs can push up prices' but 'too early to say' what impact will be

Finance
Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell opted against wading too far into the tariff battle during a speech Friday, though he acknowledged it's a concern for business."It's too early to say" what effect a potential trade war between the U.S. and China would have on the economic outlook, the central bank chief said at an event in Chicago.Should the situation escalate, it could be inflationary, he added."Tariffs can push up prices, but again it's too early to say whether that's going to be something that happens or not," Powell said during a question-and-answer session that followed his first economic speech since he took the Fed reins in February.Businesses have expressed concern about the impact of a further trade battle. President Donald Trump on Thursday said the administration is looking in...