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Repeated head impacts, brain injury increase risk for depression, study finds

Repeated head impacts, brain injury increase risk for depression, study finds

Health
June 26 (UPI) -- Head injuries experienced while young may increase a person's risk for depression and dementia decades later, according to a study published Friday by the journal Neurology. In general, those with a history of repetitive head impacts scored 1.24 points higher on a 15-point depression symptom scale than those without a history, the researchers found. Advertisement Study participants with a history of traumatic brain injury, or TBI, had scores up to 0.75 points higher, they said. "The findings underscore that repetitive hits to the head, such as those from contact sport participation or physical abuse, might be associated with later-life symptoms of depression," study co-author Michael Alosco said in a press release. "It should be made clear that this association is likely...
Violent meteorite impacts forged parts of the lunar crust

Violent meteorite impacts forged parts of the lunar crust

Science
May 11 (UPI) -- Parts of the moon's crust were forged by large and violent meteorite impacts, according to new research published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy. Analysis of a lunar rock, brought home by astronauts on NASA's 1972 Apollo 17 mission, revealed the presence of minerals that can only form at temperatures greater than 4,300 degrees Fahrenheit -- the kind of temperatures generated by large impact events. Researchers found evidence of a specific phase of cubic zirconia inside the lunar rock, a phase only produced at high temperatures. The mineral has since reverted to baddeleyite, but the signature of its cubic zirconia phase remains imprinted in the structure of the baddeleyite crystals. Scientists were able to date the baddeleyite to 4.3 billion years ago, which sugges...
Badger culls have varying impacts on cattle TB

Badger culls have varying impacts on cattle TB

Science
The UK government's badger cull has had mixed effects on the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in cattle, a new study reports.A team found the incidence of cattle TB had fallen in two areas where badgers had been culled and slightly increased in a third area.Farming groups claim the figures demonstrate badger culls are working.But researchers are more cautious about the results, which have been published in the journal Scientific ReportsGloucestershire saw a 66% fall in incidence of cattle TB and Somerset saw a 36% drop over the period between 2013 and 2017. Dorset, the third badger culling zone, saw a 10% increase, which the report's authors say is not statistically significant, in cattle TB from 2015 to 2017.Co-author Christl Donnelly from Oxford Universit...
Climate change: Impacts ‘accelerating’ as leaders gather for UN talks

Climate change: Impacts ‘accelerating’ as leaders gather for UN talks

Science
The signs and impacts of global warming are speeding up, the latest science on climate change, published ahead of key UN talks in New York, says.The data, compiled by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), says the five-year period from 2014 to 2019 is the warmest on record. Sea-level rise has accelerated significantly over the same period, as CO2 emissions have hit new highs.The WMO says carbon-cutting efforts have to be intensified immediately.The climate statement is a pull-together of the latest science on the causes and growing impacts of unprecedented levels of warming seen in recent years. Recognising that global temperatures have risen by 1.1 degrees C since 1850, the paper notes they have gone up by 0.2C between 2011 and 2015. ...
Study: Impacts of extreme weather on communities influences climate beliefs

Study: Impacts of extreme weather on communities influences climate beliefs

Science
May 31 (UPI) -- New research suggests the impact of extreme weather on a person's neighbors and community has a greater influence on a person's climate change beliefs than individual losses. "We found that damage at the zip-code level as measured by FEMA was positively associated with stronger climate change beliefs even three or four years after the extreme flooding event our study examined," Elizabeth A. Albright, an assistant professor of the practice of environmental science and policy methods at Duke University, said in a news release. Albright and her colleagues sent surveys to a variety of communities impacted by heavy rains and flooding in Colorado. Researchers surveyed individuals that were directly impacted by flooding, as well as those that avoided individual property damages....