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Brexit will increase food supply chain costs, warn business groups

Brexit will increase food supply chain costs, warn business groups

Business
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Study: Sickle cell trait does not increase heart disease risk in African Americans

Study: Sickle cell trait does not increase heart disease risk in African Americans

Health
Jan. 5 (UPI) -- Carrying the sickle cell trait does not play a significant role in the increased risk for coronary heart disease among African Americans, a study published Tuesday by JAMA Network Open found. Although African Americans are twice as likely to die from heart disease than White people, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, those carrying the sickle cell trait have only a 3% higher risk for heart problems than those who don't, the new data showed. Advertisement It's likely that other health problems, such as higher rates of high blood pressure and diabetes, contribute more to heart disease risk among African Americans than sickle cell, the researchers said. "We don't see sickle cell trait as significant risk factor by itself," study co-author Dr. Hy...
Alien species to increase by 36 percent globally by 2050

Alien species to increase by 36 percent globally by 2050

Science
Oct. 1 (UPI) -- The number alien species is projected to increase by 36 percent by 2050, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Global Change Biology. Species are classified as alien when they colonize habitat outside their native ranges. Advertisement To predict how many new species will become aliens in the decades ahead, researchers relied on a mathematical model to analyze current rates of invasion, consider the source pool of possible invaders and produce simulations based on a 'business-as-usual' scenario. The model predicted that by the middle of the century, there will be 36 percent more alien plant and animal species than there were in 2005. If current invasion rates continue apace, the data suggests Europe will fare particularly poorly, with the continent ex...
Study predicts increase in mosquito-borne diseases as planet warms

Study predicts increase in mosquito-borne diseases as planet warms

Science
Sept. 9 (UPI) -- According to a new model, urbanization and rising global temperatures will expand the range of the mosquito species, Aedes aegypti, responsible for spreading a number of debilitating diseases, including yellow fever, Zika, chikungunya and dengue fever. In a new paper, published Wednesday in the journal Lancet Planetary Health, scientists suggest infectious disease experts and public health policy makers must be ready to adapt as malaria becomes less prevalent and new threats emerge. Advertisement "Climate change is going to rearrange the landscape of infectious disease," lead study author Erin Mordecai said in a news release. "Chikungunya and dengue outbreaks like we've recently seen in East Africa are only becoming more likely across much of the continent. We need to be ...
Chemicals in food, clothing, cosmetics increase ADHD risk in children, study finds

Chemicals in food, clothing, cosmetics increase ADHD risk in children, study finds

Health
Aug. 28 (UPI) -- Exposure to certain chemicals commonly found in cosmetics and processed foods increases a child's risk for developing ADHD-like behaviors by more than 30%, according to a study published Friday by JAMA Network Open. For every two-fold rise in concentrations of chemicals called phthalates, as measured by urinalysis, a child is 34% more likely to shows signs of the neurobehavioral disorder, the data showed. Advertisement And for every two-fold increase in urine concentrations of dichlorophenols, the risk grows by 15%, the researchers said. Phthalates are used in plastics and are often found in cosmetics, lubricants, personal-care products, medical devices, detergents, packaging, children's toys, pharmaceuticals, food products and clothing, while dichlorophenols can be found...