News That Matters

Tag: Inside

Reporter's Notebook: Fukushima face-lift masks morass inside

Reporter's Notebook: Fukushima face-lift masks morass inside

Technology
Above ground, the tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear power plant has had a major face-lift since the 2011 disaster. Inside and underground remains largely a morass. A stylish new office building was the first thing that came into view during a tour for foreign media last month. Another building has a cafeteria and a convenience store. It's easy to forget you're in the official no-go zone, where access is restricted. We first went through automated security checks and radiation measurement at the new building, where 1,000 employees of Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s decommissioning unit work. A sign prohibits games such as Pokemon Go. Visitors no longer must put on hazmat suits and full-face charcoal-filter masks, or plastic shoe covers, unless they are going to the most contaminated areas. We donne...
Inside the mind of the Bank of England: how it sets rates

Inside the mind of the Bank of England: how it sets rates

Business
It's decision time. On Thursday, Bank of England policymakers will reveal their move on interest rates.How the nine members of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) vote will affect households and businesses across the UK.That's because the Bank of England base rate is used as a reference point for millions of mortgages and savings accounts.Higher rates would hit borrowers - but benefit savers.Interest rates are at a record low of 0.25% and there has not been a rise in interest rates in more than a decade.The Bank's job is to try to keep inflation at about 2%.The fall in the value of the pound pushed up the Consumer Prices Index to 3% in September - a rate not seen since 2012 - and recent sluggish growth has led to fears of a prolonged slowdown.The Bank has a supplementary goal of supporting...
Inside Blue Apron's IPO: Communication lapse chased away investors

Inside Blue Apron's IPO: Communication lapse chased away investors

Finance
Blue Apron has been a public company for less than two months. Already its stock price has been cut nearly in half, and it faces a slew of shareholder lawsuits and the departure of several executives.The confluence of these events and the magnitude of their occurrence at Blue Apron is rare. Many of them could have been avoided if shares of the meal delivery upstart had been priced better at the onset.So what happened? Blue Apron hired two of the best brands in stock underwriting — Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley — to figure out the right price. In the end, they were off by a factor of three.It's not like the challenges at the company were ever a surprise. Amazon announced a deal to acquire Whole Foods on June 16, a combination that threatened to eat into much — or all — of Blue Apron's ma
What life's like inside Jaypee wish town

What life's like inside Jaypee wish town

Finance
NOIDA: Of the 32,000 flats being built, 6,500 have been handed over and people have moved in. But most are complaining of inadequate infrastructure and are now not sure when things will fall into place. Most have not got their flats, and are at their wits' end with their money stuck. But life is anything but easy for those who got possession at Jaypee's sprawling Wish Town complex on the Noida-Greater Noida Expressway and moved in. Of the 32,000 flats planned, Jaypee handed over some 6,500 apartments and the others are in different stages of completion. Many of the 6,500 who got possession have either moved in or rented their flat out. And those who are now living here are a very worried lot: what happens now? Who takes care of the maintenance? Will the lifts function? Will people ever...
Astronomers detail additional evidence of water inside the moon

Astronomers detail additional evidence of water inside the moon

Science
July 24 (UPI) -- New analysis of ancient volcanic grains on the moon suggests the lunar mantle is surprisingly rich in water.When astronomers used satellite observations to survey the grains from volcanic deposits across the lunar surface, they found higher concentrations of trapped water.In 2008, scientists identified water in volcanic glass beads collected from the moon during the Apollo 15 and 17 missions. Follow-up analysis in 2011 showed lunar deposits featured as much water as basalt rock samples on Earth."The key question is whether those Apollo samples represent the bulk conditions of the lunar interior or instead represent unusual or perhaps anomalous water-rich regions within an otherwise 'dry' mantle," Ralph Milliken, an associate professor of planetary sciences at Brown Univers...